|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author (up) Anne Marie Barthe; Sébastien Truptil; Frédérick Bénaben
Title Agility of crisis response: Gathering and analyzing data through an event-driven platform Type Conference Article
Year 2014 Publication ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings – 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2014
Volume Issue Pages 250-254
Keywords Artificial intelligence; Decision support systems; Agility; Collaborative process; Complex event processing; Crisis response; Crisis situations; Event-driven architectures; Information concerning; Nuclear accidents; Information systems
Abstract The goal of this article is to introduce a platform (called Agility Service) that gathers and analyses data coming from both crisis response and crisis field by using the principles of Complex Event Processing. As a crisis situation is an unstable phenomenon (by nature or by effect of the applied response), the crisis response may be irrelevant after a while: lack of resources, arrival of a new stakeholder, unreached objectives, over-crisis, etc. Gathering data, analyze and aggregate it to deduce relevant information concerning the current crisis situation, and making this information available to the crisis cell to support decision making: these are the purposes of the described platform. A use case based on the Fukushima's nuclear accident is developed to illustrate the use of the developed prototype.
Address University of Toulouse – Mines Albi, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher The Pennsylvania State University Place of Publication University Park, PA Editor S.R. Hiltz, M.S. Pfaff, L. Plotnick, and P.C. Shih.
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780692211946 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference 11th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 291
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Adam Widera; Hanns-Alexander Dietrich; Bernd Hellingrath; Jörg Becker
Title Understanding humanitarian supply chains – Developing an integrated process analysis toolkit Type Conference Article
Year 2013 Publication ISCRAM 2013 Conference Proceedings – 10th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2013
Volume Issue Pages 210-219
Keywords Decision support systems; Information systems; Supply chain management; Decision support tools; Humanitarian logistics; Logistics process; Performance measurements; Process analysis; Reference modeling; Response performance; Technological components; Societies and institutions
Abstract In this paper we present the development of an integrated process analysis toolkit for humanitarian logistics. The toolkit integrates a conceptual and a technological component. Our approach follows a case study-based modeling and design approach. The developed concept was evaluated in two humanitarian organizations. Based on these results we extended and integrated the tool-supported process analysis approach, which is ready to use for the structural and quantitative analysis of humanitarian logistics processes. The toolkit can be applied in humanitarian organizations as a decision support tool for designing, planning and executing their logistics processes. Thus, the application affects the preparedness of humanitarian organizations as well as their response performance. The process analysis toolkit is embedded in an overall research agenda with the objective to provide humanitarian organizations with the capabilities to identify, monitor, and improve their logistics processes respecting the organization specific objectives.
Address University of Muenster, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Karlsruher Institut fur Technologie Place of Publication KIT; Baden-Baden Editor T. Comes, F. Fiedrich, S. Fortier, J. Geldermann and T. Müller
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9783923704804 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference 10th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1089
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Ahmed Nagy; Lusine Mkrtchyan; Klaas Van Der Meer
Title A CBRN detection framework using fuzzy logic Type Conference Article
Year 2013 Publication ISCRAM 2013 Conference Proceedings – 10th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2013
Volume Issue Pages 266-271
Keywords Data mining; Decision support systems; Disaster prevention; Fuzzy set theory; Information systems; Decision supports; Degree of credibility; Disaster management; Distributed approaches; Evaluation approach; Human activities; Ordered weighted aggregations; Potential values; Fuzzy logic
Abstract Identifying a chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear incident (CBRN) is a challenge. Evidence and health symptoms resulting from CBRN malevolent incident overlap with other normal non malevolent human activities. However, proper fusion of symptoms and evidence can aid in drawing conclusions with a certain degree of credibility about the existence of an incident. There are two types of incidents directly observable, overt, or indirectly observable, covert, which can be detected from the symptoms and consequences. This paper describes a framework for identifying a CBRN incident from available evidence using a fuzzy belief degree distributed approach. We present two approaches for evidence fusion and aggregation; the first, two level cumulative belief degree (CBD) while the second is ordered weighted aggregation of belief degrees (OWA). The evaluation approach undertaken shows the potential value of the two techniques.
Address SCK/CEN, Belgium
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Karlsruher Institut fur Technologie Place of Publication KIT; Baden-Baden Editor T. Comes, F. Fiedrich, S. Fortier, J. Geldermann and T. Müller
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9783923704804 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference 10th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 804
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Ana C. Calderon; Joanne Hinds; Peter Johnson
Title IntCris: A tool for enhanced communication and collective decision-making during crises Type Conference Article
Year 2014 Publication ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings – 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2014
Volume Issue Pages 205-214
Keywords Computational grammars; Disasters; Hurricanes; Information systems; Autonomous systems; Collaborative technologies; Collective decision-making; Collective intelligences; Decision making process; Emergency response; Hurricane katrina; Large-scale disasters; Decision making
Abstract Responding to a large-scale disaster such as an earthquake or hurricane is a collective problem. Human agents are increasingly collaborating with non-human agents (autonomous systems) in attempt to respond to a disaster. IntCris is a prototype intended to bring together interaction for human and non-human agents to aid the decision-making process by focusing on how to facilitate the “correct information to the correct agent” problem as well as encouraging new and agile behaviour. We focus on three categories of information: command, report and personal with a formal grammar to accompany the implementation. The requirements for the software were inspired by real life case studies from Hurricane Katrina, the Fukoshima Nuclear Disaster and Hurricane Sandy. The contribution of this work is to advance technology that brings together HAS (human and autonomous system interaction), in addition to enhancing collective intelligence.
Address University of Bath, United Kingdom
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher The Pennsylvania State University Place of Publication University Park, PA Editor S.R. Hiltz, M.S. Pfaff, L. Plotnick, and P.C. Shih.
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780692211946 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference 11th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 361
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Angel Ruiz-Zafra; Ana-Gabriela Núñez; Carmen Penadés; José H. Canós-Cerdá; Marcos R. S. Borges
Title SUCRE: Supporting users, controllers and responders in emergencies Type Conference Article
Year 2014 Publication ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings – 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2014
Volume Issue Pages 255-259
Keywords Information systems; Mobile devices; Web services; Citizens; Command and control centers; Contextual information; Emergency response; Information infrastructures; Mobile information systems; Responders; Situational awareness; Emergency services
Abstract We use the term “Personal Safety Assistants” (PSAs) to refer to a family of mobile information systems that intend to reduce the risks of both citizens and responders in emergency responses. Using their mobile devices, they can access to personalized views of the emergency plans including context-aware evacuation instructions or real time guidance to specific locations for rescue operations, among others. Additionally, both responders and citizens act as context sources sending fresh information (e.g. pictures of damaged areas) to the command and control center, increasing situational awareness. In this paper, we show how the SUCRE infrastructure collects and processes contextual information to improve the information infrastructure during responses. We describe the current status of the system and outline the incoming enhancements.
Address MYDASS, LSI, University of Granada, Spain; ISSI-DSIC, Universitat Politècnica de València, Spain; GRECO, PPGI, Universidade Federal Do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher The Pennsylvania State University Place of Publication University Park, PA Editor S.R. Hiltz, M.S. Pfaff, L. Plotnick, and P.C. Shih.
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780692211946 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference 11th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 898
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Anne Marie Barthe; Sébastien Truptil; Frédérick Bénaben
Title Towards a taxonomy of crisis management simulation tools Type Conference Article
Year 2015 Publication ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2015
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords crisis management tool; simulation; taxonomy; test-bed
Abstract Experimentation is an essential element to improve crisis management and to assess crisis management tools. Unfortunately, for the moment, real crisis management experimentations are episodic and generally focus on a specific geographical and/or thematic area. This is why the European DRIVER project aims to provide a test-bed platform where crisis management testing and experimentation can be carried out with a mix of live and simulated actions. To achieve this goal, simulation tools have to be identified, described and classified in order to (i) help the user to select tools and models based on the experimentation requirements and (ii) to allow the DRIVER platform to insure exchange information between simulated actions and live actions. This paper focuses on the taxonomy used to classify simulation tools relevant for crisis management. This taxonomy is divided into three main categories of characteristics: (i) business (type/topic of the simulation), (ii) legal (terms of use), (iii) technical (integration within the DRIVER platform and/or other crisis management (simulation) tools).
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher University of Agder (UiA) Place of Publication Kristiansand, Norway Editor L. Palen; M. Buscher; T. Comes; A. Hughes
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9788271177881 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved yes
Call Number Serial 1285
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) B.J. Vreugdenhil; N. Bellomo; P.S. Townsend
Title Using Crowd Modelling in Evacuation Decision Making Type Conference Article
Year 2015 Publication ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2015
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords crowd modelling; decision making; Decision Support; Evacuation
Abstract Public spaces are created to be used, and large crowds gather in many buildings and external spaces. Maintaining a high level of safety for these people is of utmost importance. Cameras are used for security reasons by control room personnel, who also monitor crowd movements in case of emergency. Crowd modelling can be used to detect and analyse time dependent and space dependent crowd behaviour. Despite the large amount of raw visual information being processed, crowd modelling has not been dedicated yet to evacuation decision making. Predictive information can assist the decision maker in assessing the situation in the early stages, potentially preventing the need for an evacuation. If evacuation is inescapable, a decision maker can use crowd modelling to define the quickest and safest evacuation routes. This kind of decision support will reduce the number of deaths that occur before and during an evacuation.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher University of Agder (UiA) Place of Publication Kristiansand, Norway Editor L. Palen; M. Buscher; T. Comes; A. Hughes
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9788271177881 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved yes
Call Number Serial 1288
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Bruna Diirr; Marcos Borges; David Mendonça
Title Putting plans on track in unforeseen situations Type Conference Article
Year 2015 Publication ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2015
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Disruption diagnosis; emergency response; On-the-fly adaptation; Plan revision
Abstract The dynamically evolving environment of the post-disaster scene—where unpredictable scenarios and uncertain data are commonplace—can bring about considerable complexity into response tasks. The multiplicity and interdependence of approaches to undertaking these tasks may yield many decision alternatives, further complicating the response effort. Additionally, because emergencies are evolving, expectations regarding the post-disaster scene may not match those that are actually encountered. Plans compiled before the disaster may therefore be judged as inadequate, requiring personnel to adjust or even redefine them during the response activities. This paper outlines and illustrates one approach—drawing upon the paradigm of improvisation—for providing management-level response personnel with information and tools to support on-the-fly adaptation of emergency response plans. A case study illustrates the approach application.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher University of Agder (UiA) Place of Publication Kristiansand, Norway Editor L. Palen; M. Buscher; T. Comes; A. Hughes
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9788271177881 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved yes
Call Number Serial 1293
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Erica Gralla; Jarrod Goentzel; Bartel Van de Walle
Title Understanding the information needs of field-based decision-makers in humanitarian response to sudden onset disasters Type Conference Article
Year 2015 Publication ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2015
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords decision making; humanitarian response; information requirements
Abstract The development and spread of new technology and the internet has opened a new world of possibilities to gather data and create information in a crisis. However, it is not clear which information field managers require to make the best possible decisions. As a result, it is difficult for volunteers, technology developers, and others, to collect and analyze data that results in information that is accessible and actionable for decision makers. To understand the information requirements of humanitarian responders, a workshop was conducted, bringing together eighteen experienced humanitarian responders. The results of the workshop include preliminary frameworks for decisions and information requirements that are common during the initial phases of a sudden onset disaster. These frameworks will help volunteer and technical communities to understand the information field decision-makers require to make the best possible decisions.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher University of Agder (UiA) Place of Publication Kristiansand, Norway Editor L. Palen; M. Buscher; T. Comes; A. Hughes
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9788271177881 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved yes
Call Number Serial 1286
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Flávio E. A. Horita; João Porto De Albuquerque
Title An approach to support decision-making in disaster management based on volunteer geographic information (VGI) and spatial decision support systems (SDSS) Type Conference Article
Year 2013 Publication ISCRAM 2013 Conference Proceedings – 10th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2013
Volume Issue Pages 301-306
Keywords Artificial intelligence; Decision making; Decision support systems; Disaster prevention; Information systems; Disaster management; Extreme events; Geographic information; Spatial decision support systems; Updated informations; Vgi; Volunteered geographic information; Work-in-progress; Disasters
Abstract The damage caused by recent events in Japan in 2011 and USA in 2012 highlighted the need to adopt measures to increase the resilience of communities against extreme events and disasters. In addition to the conventional and official information that is necessary for adaptation to disasters, recently, common citizens residents in the affected areas also began contributing with voluntary qualified and updated information. In this context, this work-in-progress presents an approach that uses voluntary information – Also known by VGI (Volunteered Geographic Information) – As a data source for Spatial Decision Support Systems (SDSS) in order to assist the decision-making in disaster management. Our approach consists of a framework that integrates voluntary and conventional data, a SDSS and processes and methods for decision-making. As a result, it is expected that this approach will assist official organizations in disaster management by providing mechanisms and information.
Address Department of Computer Systems, ICMC University of São Paulo, São Carlos/SP, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Karlsruher Institut fur Technologie Place of Publication KIT; Baden-Baden Editor T. Comes, F. Fiedrich, S. Fortier, J. Geldermann and T. Müller
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9783923704804 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference 10th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 592
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Heather M. Fuchs; Norbert Steigenberger; Thomas Lübcke
Title Intuition or deliberation – How do professionals make decisions in action? Type Conference Article
Year 2015 Publication ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2015
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords decision making; deliberation; dual processing; experts; intuition
Abstract Despite intense research on decision-making in action, we still know little about when decision-makers rely on deliberate vs. intuitive decision-making in decision situations under complexity and uncertainty. This paper studies decision-making modes (deliberate vs. intuitive) in complex task environments contingent on perceived complexity, experience, and decision style preference. We find that relatively inexperienced decision-makers respond to increases in subjective complexity with an increase in deliberation and tend to follow their decision style preference. Experienced decision-makers are less guided by their decision preference and respond to increases in subjective complexity only minimally. Our paper contributes to a developing stream of research linking decision-making with intra-personal and environmental properties and fosters our understanding of the conditions under which decision-makers rely on intuitive vs. deliberate decision modes. In doing so, we go one step further towards a comprehensive theory of decision-making in action.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher University of Agder (UiA) Place of Publication Kristiansand, Norway Editor L. Palen; M. Buscher; T. Comes; A. Hughes
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9788271177881 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved yes
Call Number Serial 1291
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Hossein Baharmand; Tina Comes
Title A Framework for Shelter Location Decisions by Ant Colony Optimization Type Conference Article
Year 2015 Publication ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2015
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Ant Colony Optimization; Crisis Management; Location Decision; Shelter Planning
Abstract Earthquakes frequently destroy the homes and livelihoods of thousands. One of the most important concerns after an earthquake is to find a safe shelter for the affected people. Because of large numbers of potential locations, the multitude of constraints (e.g. access to infrastructures; security); and the uncertainty prevailing (e.g., number of places required) the identification of optimal shelter locations is a complex problem. Nevertheless, rapidly locating shelters and transferring the affected people to the nearest shelters are high priority in crisis situations. In this paper, we develop a framework based on Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) to support decisions-makers in the response phase. Using the same framework, we also derive recommendations for urban planning in the preparedness phase. We demonstrate our method with a case focusing on the city of Kerman, in Iran.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher University of Agder (UiA) Place of Publication Kristiansand, Norway Editor L. Palen; M. Buscher; T. Comes; A. Hughes
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9788271177881 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved yes
Call Number Serial 1292
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Jan Maarten Schraagen; Aletta Eikelboom; Kees Van Dongen; Guido Te Brake
Title Experimental evaluation of a critical thinking tool to support decision making in crisis situations Type Conference Article
Year 2005 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM 2005 – 2nd International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2005
Volume Issue Pages 181-189
Keywords Accidents; Decision support systems; Information systems; Crisis management; Crisis situations; Critical thinking; Decision making process; Decision supports; Experimental evaluation; Laboratory experiments; Situation awareness; Decision making
Abstract Building up proper situation awareness is one of the most difficult tasks in the beginning stages of large-scale accidents. As ambiguous information about the events becomes available, decision makers are often tempted to quickly choose a particular story to explain the events. Subsequent information that contradicts the initial story may easily be discarded and cognitive tunnel vision takes over. Our approach, as part of the COMBINED Systems project, is to prevent tunnel vision by providing critical thinking support. In a laboratory experiment with 60 participants, we tested this hypothesis by comparing the Critical Thinking tool with a 'no support' control condition and a 'minimal support' condition. Participants acted as crisis managers determining the likely cause of an accident based on different pieces of information. The results show a positive impact of the tool on both the decision making process and decision making effectiveness.
Address TNO Human Factors, Soesterberg, Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium Place of Publication Brussels Editor B. Van de Walle, B. Carle
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9076971099 Medium
Track DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS Expedition Conference 2nd International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 925
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Jill L. Drury; Gary L. Klein; Jennifer Mathieu; Yikun Liu; Mark Pfaff
Title Sympathetic decisions: Incorporating impacts on others into emergency response decision spaces Type Conference Article
Year 2013 Publication ISCRAM 2013 Conference Proceedings – 10th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2013
Volume Issue Pages 199-209
Keywords Decision making; Decision support systems; Experiments; Information systems; Decision space; Decision supports; Emergency response; Instant messages; Public communications; Robust decisions; Situation awareness; Emergency services
Abstract We designed two decision support tools and employed them during a one-week, simulation-driven experiment that included emergency responders acting in their real-life roles. Each tool visualized a “decision space”: A diagrammatic depiction of the relative desirability of one option versus another, including the inherent uncertainty in the potential outcomes. One requirement was to develop a tool accounting for the impacts of decisions on others, so that emergency responders can make “sympathetic decisions.” For example, one decision space enabled responders to request resources from surrounding jurisdictions while also considering the potential negative effects on the lending organizations. Another decision space enabled responders to engage in a strategic dialogue with the public: “listening” to the public's greatest concerns by mining social media to measure emotion, and thereby suggesting strategic communications addressing those concerns. We report how we designed the decision spaces and the qualitative results of using these spaces during the experiment.
Address MITRE Corporation mitre.org, United States; Indiana University Indianapolis, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Karlsruher Institut fur Technologie Place of Publication KIT; Baden-Baden Editor T. Comes, F. Fiedrich, S. Fortier, J. Geldermann and T. Müller
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9783923704804 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference 10th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 456
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Jonas Landgren
Title Insights from an ethnographic study of a foreign response team during the EBOLA Outbreak in Liberia Type Conference Article
Year 2015 Publication ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2015
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Changing needs; Coordination; Ebola Outbreak; ethnography; Foreign response team; Operative response work; Planning
Abstract Organizing response operations during large-scale and complex disasters requires an ability to meet and adapt to sudden changes of plans. This paper presents descriptive accounts from an ethnographic field study of the work of a foreign Ebola response team during the Ebola outbreak on location in Liberia. The findings illustrate how response work is subject to frequent and rapid changes that result in unforeseen consequences that could cause frictions and dilemmas. The findings imply tentative implications for design, suggesting a need for improved decision support for re-planning and re-designing of ongoing response operations.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher University of Agder (UiA) Place of Publication Kristiansand, Norway Editor L. Palen; M. Buscher; T. Comes; A. Hughes
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9788271177881 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved yes
Call Number Serial 1284
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Katherine Lamb; Martijn Boosman; Jim Davies
Title Introspect Model: Competency Assessment in the Virtual World Type Conference Article
Year 2015 Publication ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2015
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Assessment; decision making; Introspect model; simulation; XVR
Abstract Over the last decade the number of operational incidents responded to, has the UK Fire and Rescue Service has diminished by approximately 40% (Knight, 2013). This reduction in incident number and consequential experiential learning opportunities has resulted in a deterioration of incident evaluation skills by the incident commanders. This paper will detail the application of the ‘Introspect model’ in conjunction with the use of XVR simulation software, within Oxfordshire Fire & Rescue Service (OFRS). The model has been applied in development sessions and during competence assessment over the last 6 years. In 2009, only 45% of those candidates assessed, demonstrated the desired level of competence, compared to over 70% in 2014. The ‘Introspect model’focuses on the understanding of decision rationale, striving towards a state of unconscious competence within the crisis decision maker at the incident, to effectively compensate for the skill fade or inexperience, due to diminished incident exposure.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher University of Agder (UiA) Place of Publication Kristiansand, Norway Editor L. Palen; M. Buscher; T. Comes; A. Hughes
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9788271177881 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved yes
Call Number Serial 1281
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Kathleen A. Moore; Andrea H. Tapia; Christopher Griffin
Title Research in progress: Understanding how emergency managers evaluate crowdsourced data: A trust game-based approach Type Conference Article
Year 2013 Publication ISCRAM 2013 Conference Proceedings – 10th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2013
Volume Issue Pages 272-277
Keywords Information systems; Risk management; Crisis response; Data analysts; Decision makers; Emergency management; Empirical data; Game; Game-based approaches; Trust; Managers
Abstract The use, or barriers to use, of crowdsourced data by emergency managers has been a significant topic of scholarly discussion during the past several years. The single strongest barrier to use has been identified as one of data quality (Tapia, et. al, 2011). We argue that within this environment the Emergency Manager (EM) acts as a decision-maker and evaluator of crowdsourced data. The final judgement on whether to incorporate crowdsourced data into a Crisis response lies with the EM. In this paper we make a brief argument for the role of EM as trustworthy data analyst and then propose a model for capturing the trust-analytical behavior through game theory (Griffin, et. al, 2012). Lastly, we propose a simple computer game, which uses our model through which we will capture EM trust-analytical behavior though a future empirical data collection effort.
Address College of Information Sciences and Technology, Penn State University, United States; Applied Research Laboratory, Penn State University, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Karlsruher Institut fur Technologie Place of Publication KIT; Baden-Baden Editor T. Comes, F. Fiedrich, S. Fortier, J. Geldermann and T. Müller
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9783923704804 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference 10th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 784
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Kelli de Faria Cordeiro; Maria Luiza M Campos; Marcos R. S. Borges
Title Adaptive integration of information supporting decision making: A case on humanitarian logistic Type Conference Article
Year 2014 Publication ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings – 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2014
Volume Issue Pages 225-229
Keywords Artificial intelligence; Decision support systems; Information systems; Natural language processing systems; Graph database; Heterogeneous information; Humanitarian logistics; Knowledge integration; Linked open datum; Multi-perspective views; Relational data models; Semantic representation; Decision making
Abstract There is an urgent demand for information systems to gather heterogeneous information about needs, donations and warehouse stocks to provide an integrated view for decision making in humanitarian logistics. The dynamic flow of information, due to the unpredicted events, requires adaptive features. The traditional relational data model is not suitable due to its schema rigidity. As an alternative, Graph Data models complemented by semantic representations, like Linked Open Data on the Web, can be used. Based on both, this research proposes an approach for the adaptive integration of information and an associated architecture. An application example is discussed in a real scenario where relief goods are managed through a dynamic and multi-perspective view.
Address Center for Naval Systems Analysis of Brazilian Navy, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher The Pennsylvania State University Place of Publication University Park, PA Editor S.R. Hiltz, M.S. Pfaff, L. Plotnick, and P.C. Shih.
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780692211946 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference 11th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 414
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Laura Laguna Salvadó; Matthieu Lauras; Tina Comes
Title Humanitarian Value Stream Mapping: Application to the EBOLA Outbreak Type Conference Article
Year 2015 Publication ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2015
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Decision-Makers; Ebola Outbreak; Humanitarian Supply Chain; Value Stream Mapping
Abstract Humanitarian Supply Chain Management serves as bridge between needs and aid provided. Flows of goods and information connect the field to headquarters, distribution to procurement, beneficiaries to donors. The problems of decision-making, information sharing and coordination can be studied with this special logistics focus. We present a Value Stream Mapping approach that provides a structure to analyze and understand the problems arising in practice, such as bottlenecks; waiting times; or misaligned procurement and distribution policies. We demonstrate our lean-management approach by using the ongoing Ebola Outbreak in West Africa as Case Study.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher University of Agder (UiA) Place of Publication Kristiansand, Norway Editor L. Palen; M. Buscher; T. Comes; A. Hughes
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9788271177881 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved yes
Call Number Serial 1283
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Loïc Bidoux; Jean-Paul Pignon; Frédérick Bénaben
Title A model driven system to support optimal collaborative processes design in crisis management Type Conference Article
Year 2014 Publication ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings – 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2014
Volume Issue Pages 245-249
Keywords Algorithms; Benchmarking; Decision making; Inference engines; Optimization; Process design; Collaborative process; Crisis management; Inter-agencies coordination; Key performance indicators; Model-driven; Multi-criteria decision analysis; Optimization algorithms; Technical design; Information systems
Abstract This paper presents a system dedicated to support crises managers that is focused on the collaboration issues of the actors involved in the response. Based on context knowledge, decision makers' objectives and responders' capabilities, the system designs in a semi-automatic way a set of collaborative process alternatives that can optimize coordination activities during an ongoing crisis resolution. The technical design of the system mixes optimization algorithms with inference of logical rules on an ontology. Candidate processes are evaluated through multi-criteria decision analysis and proposed to the decision-makers with associated key performance indicators to help them with their choice. The overall approach is model driven through a crisis meta-model and an axiomatic theory of crisis management.
Address Mines Albi – Université de Toulouse, France; Thales Communications and Security, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher The Pennsylvania State University Place of Publication University Park, PA Editor S.R. Hiltz, M.S. Pfaff, L. Plotnick, and P.C. Shih.
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780692211946 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference 11th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 325
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Louise K. Comfort; Brian A. Chalfant; Jee Eun Song; Mengyao Chen; Brian Colella
Title Managing information processes in disaster events: The impact of superstorm sandy on business organizations Type Conference Article
Year 2014 Publication ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings – 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2014
Volume Issue Pages 230-239
Keywords Disasters; Information systems; Societies and institutions; Storms; Business organizations; Community resiliences; Disaster response; Emergency response systems; Government agencies; Intergovernmental communication and coordination; Non profit organizations; Organizational network; Emergency services
Abstract Building community resilience to natural disasters represents a major policy priority for the United States as hazards impact vulnerable urban regions with increasing frequency and severity. Applying network analysis techniques, we examine the dynamics of emergency response to Superstorm Sandy, which struck the United States east coast in late October 2012 and caused over $72 billion in damages. Drawing on a variety of data sources and analytical techniques, we document the storm's impact on a system of interacting private, public, and nonprofit organizations. We find that the storm's response network exhibited clear patterns of information gaps and flows among different types of organizations. Our findings suggest a general lack of communication between government agencies and businesses, an area of potential improvement in future regional-scale emergency response systems.
Address Center for Disaster Management, University of Pittsburgh, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher The Pennsylvania State University Place of Publication University Park, PA Editor S.R. Hiltz, M.S. Pfaff, L. Plotnick, and P.C. Shih.
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780692211946 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference 11th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 409
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Magnus Jändel; Sinna Lindquist; Linus Luotsinen
Title Social coverage maps Type Conference Article
Year 2013 Publication ISCRAM 2013 Conference Proceedings – 10th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2013
Volume Issue Pages 241-250
Keywords Flow visualization; Information systems; Urban planning; Visualization; Command and control; Crisis management; Emergency planning; Human behaviours; Radioactive contamination; Social simulations; Visual representations; Wireless services; Electronic warfare
Abstract This paper introduces Social Coverage Maps (SCM) as a visual representation of the societal impact of localized disruptions in urban areas. Incited by the recent deliberate interruption of wireless services for the purpose of crowd control in San Francisco, we focus on the use of SCMs for representing emergent effects of electronic warfare. As a prequel we discuss maps and other visualizations as representations of human behaviour and relations. The SCM concept is defined and grounded in simulation-based parameters. Using an experimental scenario based on cell phone jamming in a city we show how SCMs are generated using an agent-based population simulator. We find that Social Coverage Maps could become a useful tool for analysing emergent effects of actions and events including electronic warfare, roadblocks, smoke, teargas, chemical and radioactive contamination with applications in operational and emergency planning as well as crisis management.
Address Swedish Defence Research Agency, Sweden
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Karlsruher Institut fur Technologie Place of Publication KIT; Baden-Baden Editor T. Comes, F. Fiedrich, S. Fortier, J. Geldermann and T. Müller
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9783923704804 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference 10th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 618
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Maike Kuhnert; Christian Wietfeld; Olivier Paterour; Alexander Georgiev; Katrina Petersen; Monika Büscher; Jens Pottebaum
Title Next Generation, Secure Cloud-based Pan-European Information System for Enhanced Disaster Awareness Type Conference Article
Year 2015 Publication ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2015
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Common information space; information management; pan-European communication; secure cloud-based information sharing
Abstract Information management in disaster situations is challenging, yet critical for efficient response and recovery. Today information flows are difficult to establish, partial, redundant, overly complex or insecure, besides the interoperability between heterogeneous organisations is limited. This paper presents a novel system architecture that enables combining of several communication technologies in a secure manner. This supports creation of a pan-European ‘Common Information Space’ by rescue organizations that can enable more efficient and effective information management in disaster response. Moreover, this technology can be used for disaster preparedness (e.g., training, tutorials). The modular architecture is designed to consider future evolutions of technology by defining interfaces for the integration of new technologies and services.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher University of Agder (UiA) Place of Publication Kristiansand, Norway Editor L. Palen; M. Buscher; T. Comes; A. Hughes
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9788271177881 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings – 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved yes
Call Number Serial 1282
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Marie Bartels
Title Communicating probability: A challenge for decision support systems Type Conference Article
Year 2014 Publication ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings – 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2014
Volume Issue Pages 260-264
Keywords Artificial intelligence; Critical infrastructures; Decision making; Information systems; Public works; Crisis communications; Crisis management; Decision-making under uncertainty; Inter-organizational; Interorganizational cooperation; Making decision; Decision support systems
Abstract This paper presents observations made in the course of two interorganizational crisis management exercises that were conducted in order to identify requirements for a decision support system for critical infrastructure operators. It brings into focus how different actors deal with the uncertainty of information that is relevant for other stakeholders and therefore is to be shared with them. It was analyzed how the participants articulated und comprehended assessments on how probable the reliability of a given data or prognosis was. The recipients of the information had to consider it when making decisions concerning their own network. Therefore they had to evaluate its reliability. Different strategies emerged.
Address Technische Universität Berlin, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher The Pennsylvania State University Place of Publication University Park, PA Editor S.R. Hiltz, M.S. Pfaff, L. Plotnick, and P.C. Shih.
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780692211946 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference 11th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 289
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Mark F. Taylor; Russell J. Graves
Title Adaptive risk-readiness decision support for infrastructure protection Type Conference Article
Year 2005 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM 2005 – 2nd International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2005
Volume Issue Pages 161-169
Keywords Flow visualization; Information systems; Resource allocation; Risk assessment; Risk management; Visualization; Adaptive decision making; Collaboration; Decision support interfaces; Decision supports; Dynamic decision; Emergency management; Infrastructure protection; Readiness assessment; Decision support systems
Abstract This paper presents a system concept for integrating the mass of information critical to infrastructure protection operations. Our main focus and contribution lies in (1) coupling risk assessments into a dynamic decision support process, and (2) providing a collaboration and visualization decision support interface for representing complex and changing infrastructure protection information. The system concept supports adaptive decision making based upon dynamic risk and readiness assessments. Users benefit from having a more comprehensive and up-to-date risk picture on which to base their judgments.
Address MITRE Corporation, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium Place of Publication Brussels Editor B. Van de Walle, B. Carle
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title