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Author Nilani Algiriyage; Raj Prasanna; Kristin Stock; Emma Hudson-Doyle; David Johnston; Minura Punchihewa; Santhoopa Jayawardhana
Title Towards Real-time Traffic Flow Estimation using YOLO and SORT from Surveillance Video Footage Type Conference Article
Year 2021 Publication ISCRAM 2021 Conference Proceedings – 18th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal Iscram 2021
Volume Issue Pages 40-48
Keywords Computer Vision, Traffic Flow, YOLOv4, CCTV Big Data
Abstract Traffic emergencies and resulting delays cause a significant impact on the economy and society. Traffic flow estimation is one of the early steps in urban planning and managing traffic infrastructure. Traditionally, traffic flow rates were commonly measured using underground inductive loops, pneumatic road tubes, and temporary manual counts. However, these approaches can not be used in large areas due to high costs, road surface degradation and implementation difficulties. Recent advancement of computer vision techniques in combination with freely available closed-circuit television (CCTV) datasets has provided opportunities for vehicle detection and classification. This study addresses the problem of estimating traffic flow using low-quality video data from a surveillance camera. Therefore, we have trained the novel YOLOv4 algorithm for five object classes (car, truck, van, bike, and bus). Also, we introduce an algorithm to count the vehicles using the SORT tracker based on movement direction such as ``northbound'' and ``southbound'' to obtain the traffic flow rates. The experimental results, for a CCTV footage in Christchurch, New Zealand shows the effectiveness of the proposed approach. In future research, we expect to train on large and more diverse datasets that cover various weather and lighting conditions.
Address Massey University; Massey University; Massey University; Joint Centre for Disaster Research, Massey University; Joint Center of Disaster Research, Massey University Wellington; University of Kelaniya; Univerity of Kelaniya
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Virginia Tech Place of Publication Blacksburg, VA (USA) Editor Anouck Adrot; Rob Grace; Kathleen Moore; Christopher W. Zobel
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 978-1-949373-61-5 ISBN Medium
Track (up) AI and Intelligent Systems for Crises and Risks Expedition Conference 18th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes rangika.nilani@gmail.com Approved no
Call Number ISCRAM @ idladmin @ Serial 2311
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Author Nilani Algiriyage; Raj Prasanna; Emma E H Doyle; Kristin Stock; David Johnston
Title Traffic Flow Estimation based on Deep Learning for Emergency Traffic Management using CCTV Images Type Conference Article
Year 2020 Publication ISCRAM 2020 Conference Proceedings – 17th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal Iscram 2020
Volume Issue Pages 100-109
Keywords CCTV Big Data, YOLOv3, Traffic Flow Estimation.
Abstract Emergency Traffic Management (ETM) is one of the main problems in smart urban cities. This paper focuses on selecting an appropriate object detection model for identifying and counting vehicles from closed-circuit television (CCTV) images and then estimating traffic flow as the first step in a broader project. Therefore, a case is selected at one of the busiest roads in Christchurch, New Zealand. Two experiments were conducted in this research; 1) to evaluate the accuracy and speed of three famous object detection models namely faster R-CNN, mask R-CNN and YOLOv3 for the data set, 2) to estimate the traffic flow by counting the number of vehicles in each of the four classes such as car, bus, truck and motorcycle. A simple Region of Interest (ROI) heuristic algorithm is used to classify vehicle movement direction such as \quotes{left-lane} and \quotes{right-lane}. This paper presents the early results and discusses the next steps.
Address Joint Centre for Disaster Research, Massey University; Joint Centre for Disaster Research, Massey University; Joint Centre for Disaster Research, Massey University; Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University; Joint Centre for Disaster Research, Massey University;
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Virginia Tech Place of Publication Blacksburg, VA (USA) Editor Amanda Hughes; Fiona McNeill; Christopher W. Zobel
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 978-1-949373-27-10 ISBN 2411-3396 Medium
Track (up) AI Systems for Crisis and Risks Expedition Conference 17th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes r.nilani@massey.ac.nz Approved no
Call Number Serial 2211
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Author Nilani Algiriyage; Rangana Sampath; Raj Prasanna; Kristin Stock; Emma Hudson-Doyle; David Johnston
Title Identifying Disaster-related Tweets: A Large-Scale Detection Model Comparison Type Conference Article
Year 2021 Publication ISCRAM 2021 Conference Proceedings – 18th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal Iscram 2021
Volume Issue Pages 731-743
Keywords Tweet Classification, Machine Learning, Deep Learning, Disasters
Abstract Social media applications such as Twitter and Facebook are fast becoming a key instrument in gaining situational awareness (understanding the bigger picture of the situation) during disasters. This has provided multiple opportunities to gather relevant information in a timely manner to improve disaster response. In recent years, identifying crisis-related social media posts is analysed as an automatic task using machine learning (ML) or deep learning (DL) techniques. However, such supervised learning algorithms require labelled training data in the early hours of a crisis. Recently, multiple manually labelled disaster-related open-source twitter datasets have been released. In this work, we create a large dataset with 186,718 tweets by combining a number of such datasets and evaluate the performance of multiple ML and DL algorithms in classifying disaster-related tweets in three settings, namely ``in-disaster'', ``out-disaster'' and ``cross-disaster''. Our results show that the Bidirectional LSTM model with Word2Vec embeddings performs well for the tweet classification task in all three settings. We also make available the preprocessing steps and trained weights for future research.
Address Massey University; Massey University; Massey University; Massey University; Joint Centre for Disaster Research, Massey University; Joint Center of Disaster Research, Massey University Wellington
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Virginia Tech Place of Publication Blacksburg, VA (USA) Editor Anouck Adrot; Rob Grace; Kathleen Moore; Christopher W. Zobel
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 978-1-949373-61-5 ISBN Medium
Track (up) Social Media for Disaster Response and Resilience Expedition Conference 18th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes rangika.nilani@gmail.com Approved no
Call Number ISCRAM @ idladmin @ Serial 2368
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