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Author Jamie Shackleton
Title Citizen Translation and a Community Engagement Approach to Promoting Preparedness in CALD Communities Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 400-407
Keywords Translation, CALD, Preparedness, Community Engagement
Abstract Emergency preparedness for CALD (culturally and linguistically diverse) communities has been identified as a significant gap in DRM (disaster risk management) research and practice. Using a community engagement approach, a practitioner in Wellington, New Zealand implemented a Citizen Translation project to have volunteers from 15 communities facilitate translations for a new local Earthquake Preparedness Guide, in partnership with local Civil Defense and an international crisis translation team, INTERACT. Initial findings have shown that consultation with community members over the translation of their language has been a powerful way to establish initial links into the community and instigate discussion and feedback about emergency preparedness; it has led to further projects including emergency messaging translations. This work in progress raises an important and often overlooked discourse on inclusiveness in DRM activities and the potential for community engagement to play a role with CALD community preparedness.
Address New Zealand Red Cross
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Understanding Risk, Risk Reduction, Consequences and Forecasting Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1652
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Author Diana De Alwis; Ilan Noy
Title Sri Lankan Households a Decade after the Indian Ocean Tsunami Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 339-350
Keywords Sri Lanka, tsunami, disaster, household survey, long-run impact
Abstract We estimate the causal effect of the Indian Ocean tsunami in Sri Lanka on household income and consumption eight years after the event, using a quasi-experimental method. A strong association between area-wide tsunami disaster shock and increases in household income and consumption in the long-term emerged from our empirical investigation. Deviating from the common observation on short-term impacts, these results are suggestive of an optimistic potential for some long-lasting potentially successful recovery scenarios. Still, Sri Lanka received a very large amount of external transfers post-tsunami, much larger than is typical for disaster events and one which may not be replicable in other cases. Our findings suggest a more nuanced picture with respect to household consumption impacts. We observe a reduction of food consumption and only find an increase in non-food consumption. The increase in non-food consumption is much smaller than the observed increase in income. We also find that households in high-income regions experienced much better recovery from the disaster. Keywords Sri Lanka, Tsunami, disaster, household survey, long-run impact
Address Victoria University of Wellington; Victoria University of Wellington
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Understanding Risk, Risk Reduction, Consequences and Forecasting Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1662
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Author Jacob Pastor; Ilan Noy; Isabelle Sin
Title Flood risk and flood insurance in New Zealand Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 381-399
Keywords Flood risk, insurance, liabilities
Abstract The standard framework for undertaking a risk assessment of a natural hazard involves analyzing the interaction of three components: Hazard data (in the form of maps), the elements exposed to the hazard (exposure), and measures of these elements' vulnerability (understood as the susceptibility to harm or damage). In New Zealand, national flood risk remains unquantified due to the absence of national flood inundation hazard map coverage. In this paper, we develop a methodology that aims to fill this gap by estimating instead the likelihood of a flood insurance claim for a stock of residential buildings. We estimate a non-linear limited-dependent variable model and using a set of fragility functions (also known as damage curves), we calculate the expected monetary losses under plausible flood depth scenarios. The outcome of this research could inform insurers of their potential liabilities and threats to their financial sustainability in the face of flood and storms.
Address Victoria University of Wellington; Victoria University of Wellington; MOTU
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Understanding Risk, Risk Reduction, Consequences and Forecasting Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1669
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Author Cary Milkop; Najif Ismail
Title The Poor Performance of Non Structural Components in Seismic Events in Context Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 351-365
Keywords seismology earthquake retrofitting
Abstract Damage to non-structural components (NSCs) in seismic events has been identified as a recurring problem in New Zealand for decades. It is also a problem in comparable seismic risk countries. Whilst improvements have been made and lessons learned, the complexity of suspended ceilings has also grown. The purpose of this article is to review the situation for suspended NSCs and to discuss recommendations. Whilst NSCs have not received the attention that structural components have, they are a significant source of costs and consequences should they fail in seismic events. Several articles have emerged surrounding NSC failure but owing to the inherent complexity of the subject, there is no one document that covers all aspects. The poor performance of NSCs in seismic events has been known and written about for several decades. The USA is a comparable and useful source of information around what has proven to be effective and system-changing.
Address Wellington Institute of Technology; Wellington Institute of Technology
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-0-473-45447-0 Medium
Track Understanding Risk, Risk Reduction, Consequences and Forecasting Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1681
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Author Andrew Sherson; S Uma; Raj Prasanna
Title The effect of localised factors on water pipe repair times post-earthquake Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 366-380
Keywords Lifelines, Earthquake, Localised factors, repair times
Abstract In the Wellington Region, many lifelines are at risk, because they are in vulnerable narrow corridors close to active faults. In an earthquake, it is expected that these lifelines will be significantly damaged and unusable for extended periods of time. Because of this risk, many studies have been conducted to investigate the resulting downtimes. These studies, despite their usefulness, do not incorporate or make significant assumptions about localised factors. This paper summarises a thesis that aimed to improve the current predictive models, by including these local, and contextual influences. Multiple stakeholders who manage and repair the lifelines were interviewed to identify these factors which were then included into one of the current predictive models, and the influence on repair times was recorded. It was discovered that localised impacts such as staff logistics, land sliding, the land gradient, interdependency, and access doubled previous predicted repair times.
Address Joint Centre for Disaster Research / Massey University; Stantec; GNS Science
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-0-473-45447-0 Medium
Track Understanding Risk, Risk Reduction, Consequences and Forecasting Expedition Conference ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience - 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific
Notes sherson.andrew@gmail.com Approved no
Call Number Serial 1685
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