|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author (up) Abbas Ganji; Tom Wilson; Sonia Saveli; Dharma Dailey; Mark Haselkorn
Title Cause and Effect: A Qualitative Analysis of Obstacles to Information Sharing During a Regional Disaster Exercise Type Conference Article
Year 2019 Publication Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response And Management Abbreviated Journal Iscram 2019
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Information Sharing; Disaster Response; Qualitative Analysis; Collaboration; Coordination
Abstract After large-scale disasters, diverse partner agencies rely heavily on an information-sharing environment that supports collaborative work. In the U.S., this occurs under the Incident Command System (ICS), a structured organizational framework for coordinated action. We explore obstacles to information sharing and coordinationobserved at a county-level Emergency Operations Center (EOC) operating under ICS during the response phase of a large-scale regional disaster exercise. Textual observations collected in situ are analyzed for both the effect/manifestation and cause/source of barriers to information sharing. Two-thirds of barriers that manifest as computational issues are not caused by technology breakdowns, and a third caused by unclear processes manifest as computational issues. Overall, obstacles to collaborative work that appear to be related to computational issues are generally attributable to non-technical causes. This indicates that resources directed at improving collaborative management of disasters by enhancing technological capabilities are likely to be misdirected.
Address University of Washington, United States of America
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Iscram Place of Publication Valencia, Spain Editor Franco, Z.; González, J.J.; Canós, J.H.
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 978-84-09-10498-7 Medium
Track T2- Command and control studies Expedition Conference 16th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management (ISCRAM 2019)
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1848
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Dharma Dailey; Kate Starbird
Title Visible skepticism: Community vetting after Hurricane Irene Type Conference Article
Year 2014 Publication ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings – 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2014
Volume Issue Pages 777-781
Keywords Hardware; Crisis informatics; Crowdsourcing; Information diffusion; Journalism; Misinformation; Rumors; Social media; Information systems
Abstract Social media enable rapid, peer-to-peer information flow during crisis events, affordances that have both positive and negative consequences. The potential for spreading misinformation is a significant concern. Drawing on an empirical study of information-sharing practices in a crisis-affected community in the Catskill Mountains after Hurricane Irene, this paper describes how an ad hoc group of community members, led by a handful of journalists, employed specific work practices to mitigate misinformation. We illustrate how the group appropriated specific tools and performed visible skepticism, among other techniques, to help control the spread of false rumors. These findings suggest implications for the design of tools and the development of best practices for supporting community-led, crowd-powered response efforts during disasters.
Address Human Centered Design and Engineering, University of Washington, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher The Pennsylvania State University Place of Publication University Park, PA Editor S.R. Hiltz, M.S. Pfaff, L. Plotnick, and P.C. Shih.
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780692211946 Medium
Track Social Media in Crisis Response and Management Expedition Conference 11th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 421
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author (up) Elodie Fichet; John Robinson; Dharma Dailey; Kate Starbird
Title Eyes on the Ground: Emerging Practices in Periscope Use during Crisis Events Type Conference Article
Year 2016 Publication ISCRAM 2016 Conference Proceedings – 13th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2016
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Social Media; Periscope; Twitter; Crisis Informatics; Emergency Management
Abstract This empirical analysis examines the use of the live-streaming application Periscope in three crises that occurred in 2015. Qualitative analyses of tweets relating to the Amtrak derailment in Philadelphia, Baltimore protests after Freddie Grey’s death, and Hurricane Joaquin flooding in South Carolina reveal that this recently deployed application is being used by both citizens and journalists for information sharing, crisis coverage and commentary. The accessibility and immediacy of live video directly from crisis situations, and the embedded chats which overlay on top of a video feed, extend the possibilities of real-time interaction between remote crowds and those on the ground in a crisis. These empirical findings suggest several potential challenges and opportunities for responders.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Federal University of Rio de Janeiro Place of Publication Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Editor A. Tapia; P. Antunes; V.A. Bañuls; K. Moore; J. Porto
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3388 ISBN 978-84-608-7984-9 Medium
Track Social Media Studies Expedition Conference 13th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number ISCRAM @ idladmin @ Serial 1391
Share this record to Facebook