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Author Jeannette N. Sutton; Emma S. Spiro; Britta Johnson; Sean M. Fitzhugh; Mathew Greczek; Carter T. Butts
Title Connected communications: Network structures of official communications in a technological disaster Type Conference Article
Year 2012 Publication (up) ISCRAM 2012 Conference Proceedings – 9th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2012
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Disasters; Information dissemination; Information systems; Oil spills; Direct communications; Informal communication; Information exchanges; Micro-blogging services; Network structures; On-line information; Social media; Technological disasters; Social networking (online)
Abstract Informal online communication channels are being utilized for official communications in disaster contexts. Channels such as networked microblogging enable public officials to broadcast messages as well as engage in direct communication exchange with individuals. Here we investigate online information exchange behaviors of a set of state and federal organizations during the Deepwater Horizon 2010 oil spill disaster. Using data from the popular microblogging service Twitter, we analyze the roles individual organizations play in the dissemination of information to the general public online, and the conversational microstructure of official posts. We discuss characteristics and features of following networks, centrality, and conversational dynamics that may affect information exchange in disaster. This research provides insight into the use of networked communications during an event of heightened public concern, describes implications of conversational features, and suggests directions for future research. © 2012 ISCRAM.
Address University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, United States; University of California, Irvine, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Simon Fraser University Place of Publication Vancouver, BC Editor L. Rothkrantz, J. Ristvej, Z.Franco
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780864913326 Medium
Track Social Media and Collaborative Systems Expedition Conference 9th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 214
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Author Jeannette N. Sutton; Emma S. Spiro; Sean M. Fitzhugh; Britta Johnson; Ben Gibson; Carter T. Butts
Title Terse message amplification in the Boston bombing response Type Conference Article
Year 2014 Publication (up) ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings – 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2014
Volume Issue Pages 612-621
Keywords Information systems; Terrorism; Counter-terrorism operations; Criminal investigation; Improvised explosive devices; National incident management systems; Public information; Terse messaging; Twitter; Urban environments; Information management
Abstract On the morning of April 15, 2013, an Improvised Explosive Device (IED) was detonated near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, resulting in a large number of casualties. This generated a week-long response under the US National Incident Management System. In this paper, we examine online, terse messages broadcast by responding organizations and their amplification by other official entities via retransmission. Content analysis of official messages shows strong similarities with posting patterns previously observed in response to natural hazards, with the primary exception of themes related to the criminal investigation, suggesting a possible revision of guidelines for public information in light of the needs arising from extended counterterrorism operations undertaken in an urban environment. Network analysis demonstrates message posting and amplification were dominated by local actors, underscoring the importance of local readiness for management of official public information activities in the context of extremely high-profile events.
Address Trauma, Health and Hazards Center, University of Colorado, United States; Department of Sociology, University of California, United States; Department of Sociology, Institute for Mathematical Behavioral Sciences, University of California, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher The Pennsylvania State University Place of Publication University Park, PA Editor S.R. Hiltz, M.S. Pfaff, L. Plotnick, and P.C. Shih.
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780692211946 Medium
Track Social Media in Crisis Response and Management Expedition Conference 11th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 986
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Author Amirah M. Majid; Emma S. Spiro
Title Crisis in a Foreign Language: Emergency Services and Limited English Populations Type Conference Article
Year 2016 Publication (up) ISCRAM 2016 Conference Proceedings ? 13th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2016
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Limited English Proficiency Populations; Policy; Social Media; Social Practices
Abstract Social media are increasingly used by emergency responders as part of the communication infrastructure during crisis. As such, it is important to understand how these new technologies offer opportunities and barriers to information access for population affected during crisis events. In particular, this project explores the extent to which Twitter is used to provide emergency-related information to vulnerable populations both during routine and crisis contexts. We look longitudinally, across four years, at the online information and communication behaviors of official emergency responders in the United States. Our results demonstrate a notable lack of cross-language crisis communication on social media. We discuss the practical implications of these results, and offer directions for future work and improvement of practices.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Federal University of Rio de Janeiro Place of Publication Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Editor A. Tapia; P. Antunes; V.A. Bañuls; K. Moore; J. Porto
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3423 ISBN 978-84-608-7984-44 Medium
Track Ethical, Legal and Social Issues Expedition Conference 13th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1363
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Author Tom Wilson; Stephanie A. Stanek; Emma S. Spiro; Kate Starbird
Title Language Limitations in Rumor Research? Comparing French and English Tweets Sent During the 2015 Paris Attacks Type Conference Article
Year 2017 Publication (up) Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response And Management Abbreviated Journal Iscram 2017
Volume Issue Pages 546-553
Keywords social media; rumoring, language; crisis informatics; information diffusion
Abstract The ubiquity of social media facilitates widespread participation in crises. As individuals converge online to understand a developing situation, rumors can emerge. Little is currently known about how online rumoring behavior varies by language. Exploring a rumor from the 2015 Paris Attacks, we investigate Twitter rumoring behaviors across two languages: French, the primary language of the affected population; and English, the dominant language of Internet communication. We utilize mixed methods to qualitatively code and quantitatively analyze rumoring behaviors across French and English language tweets. Most interestingly, temporal engagement in the rumor varies across languages, but proportions of tweets affirming and denying a rumor are very similar. Analyzing tweet deletions and retweet counts, we find slight (but not significant) differences between languages. This work offers insight into potential limitations of previous research of online rumoring, which often focused exclusively on English language content, and demonstrates the importance of considering language in future work.
Address Human Centered Design and Engineering, University of Washington ; Information School, Department of Sociology, University of Washington
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Iscram Place of Publication Albi, France Editor Tina Comes, F.B., Chihab Hanachi, Matthieu Lauras, Aurélie Montarnal, eds
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN Medium
Track Social Media Studies Expedition Conference 14th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response And Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 2042
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