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Author Theresa I. Jefferson; John R. Harrald
Title Estimating the impacts associated with the detonation of an improvised nuclear device Type Conference Article
Year (down) 2014 Publication ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings – 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2014
Volume Issue Pages 80-84
Keywords Disasters; Information systems; Radiation protection; Urban planning; Building structure; Computer based tools; Improvised nuclear devices; Man-made disasters; Planning process; Preparedness; Response capability; Scale and scope; Detonation
Abstract The explosion of an improvised nuclear device (IND), in any American city, would cause devastating physical and social impacts. These impacts would exceed the response capabilities of any city, state or region. The potential loss and suffering caused by an IND detonation can be dramatically reduced through informed planning and preparedness. By incorporating estimates of the impacts associated with the detonation of an IND into the planning process, jurisdictions can estimate the scale and scope of their response requirements. A prototype, computer-based tool was developed to quantify the human impacts associated with an IND detonation. Using various types of information such as the approximation of the prompt radiation footprint, blast footprint, and thermal footprint of the detonation, along with an estimation of the level of protection provided by building structures the system calculates the number and type of injuries that can be expected in a monocentric urban area.
Address Loyola University Maryland, United States; Virginia Polytechnic Institute, State University, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher The Pennsylvania State University Place of Publication University Park, PA Editor S.R. Hiltz, M.S. Pfaff, L. Plotnick, and P.C. Shih.
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780692211946 Medium
Track Analytic Modeling and Simulation Expedition Conference 11th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 624
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Author Frank Fiedrich; Bartel A. Van De Walle; Theresa I. Jefferson; John R. Harrald
Title Welcome message from the ISCRAM2008 Conference and Program Chairs Type Conference Article
Year (down) 2008 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM 2008 – 5th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2008
Volume Issue Pages -
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM Place of Publication Washington, DC Editor F. Fiedrich, B. Van de Walle
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780615206974 Medium
Track Expedition Conference 5th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 492
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Author Sarp Yeletaysi; Frank Fiedrich; John R. Harrald
Title A framework for integrating GIS and systems simulation to analyze operational continuity of the petroleum supply chain Type Conference Article
Year (down) 2008 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM 2008 – 5th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2008
Volume Issue Pages 586-595
Keywords Critical infrastructures; Disaster prevention; Disasters; Energy resources; Hurricanes; Information systems; Petroleum analysis; Public works; Supply chain management; Disaster management; Disruptions; Hurricane katrina; Hurricane Rita; Petroleum supply; Systems simulation; Geographic information systems
Abstract Crisis and disaster management is a field that requires the understanding and application of tools and knowledge from multiple disciplines. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 have proven that U.S. petroleum infrastructure is vulnerable to major supply disruptions as a direct result of disasters. Due to the structure of U.S. oil supply chain, primary oil production centers (i.e. PADD* 3) are geographically separated from primary demand centers (i.e. PADD 1), which creates a natural dependency between those districts. To better understand the extent of those dependencies and downstream impacts of supply disruptions, a multi-disciplinary research approach is necessary. The cross-disciplines in this research include disaster management, critical infrastructure and oil supply chain management, and the utilization of geographic information systems (GIS) and systems simulation. This paper specifically focuses on the framework for integrating GIS and systems simulation as analysis tools in this research.
Address George Washington University, ICDRM, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM Place of Publication Washington, DC Editor F. Fiedrich, B. Van de Walle
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780615206974 Medium
Track Impact of Disasters on Industry and Economic Effects Expedition Conference 5th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1130
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Author John R. Harrald; Theresa I. Jefferson; Frank Fiedrich; Sebnem Sener; Clinton Mixted-Freeman
Title A first step in decision support tools for humanitarian assistance during catastrophic disasters: Modeling hazard generated needs Type Conference Article
Year (down) 2007 Publication Intelligent Human Computer Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM 2007 Academic Proceedings Papers Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2007
Volume Issue Pages 51-56
Keywords Artificial intelligence; Disasters; Hazards; Catastrophic earthquake; Catastrophic event; Decision support tools; Decision supports; Emergency responders; Humanitarian assistances; Humanitarian relief; Paper documents; Decision support systems
Abstract The US has not yet developed adequate models for estimating hazard generated needs, the necessary first step for developing useful decision support systems needed to estimate the capability and capacity of the response forces required. Modeling and technology required to support the decisions made by humanitarian relief organizations requires scenario driven catastrophic planning. This paper documents the lack of effective decision support tools and systems for humanitarian aid and describes the current state of models and methods used for determination of hazard generated needs. The paper discusses work performed on a catastrophic earthquake preparedness project. It outlines how the results of this project will be used to advance the modeling and decision support capabilities of federal, state and local disaster planners and emergency responders.
Address George Washington University (GWU), Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management (ICDRM), United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM Place of Publication Delft Editor B. Van de Walle, P. Burghardt, K. Nieuwenhuis
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9789054874171; 9789090218717 Medium
Track HOPS Expedition Conference 4th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 561
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