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Author Ana C. Calderon; Joanne Hinds; Peter Johnson
Title IntCris: A tool for enhanced communication and collective decision-making during crises Type Conference Article
Year 2014 Publication ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings – 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2014
Volume Issue Pages 205-214
Keywords Computational grammars; Disasters; Hurricanes; Information systems; Autonomous systems; Collaborative technologies; Collective decision-making; Collective intelligences; Decision making process; Emergency response; Hurricane katrina; Large-scale disasters; Decision making
Abstract Responding to a large-scale disaster such as an earthquake or hurricane is a collective problem. Human agents are increasingly collaborating with non-human agents (autonomous systems) in attempt to respond to a disaster. IntCris is a prototype intended to bring together interaction for human and non-human agents to aid the decision-making process by focusing on how to facilitate the “correct information to the correct agent” problem as well as encouraging new and agile behaviour. We focus on three categories of information: command, report and personal with a formal grammar to accompany the implementation. The requirements for the software were inspired by real life case studies from Hurricane Katrina, the Fukoshima Nuclear Disaster and Hurricane Sandy. The contribution of this work is to advance technology that brings together HAS (human and autonomous system interaction), in addition to enhancing collective intelligence.
Address University of Bath, United Kingdom
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher The Pennsylvania State University Place of Publication University Park, PA Editor S.R. Hiltz, M.S. Pfaff, L. Plotnick, and P.C. Shih.
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780692211946 Medium
Track Decision Support Systems Expedition Conference 11th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 361
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Author Paola Di Maio
Title Ontologies for networked centric emergency mangement operations Type Conference Article
Year 2008 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM 2008 – 5th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2008
Volume Issue Pages 177-188
Keywords Civil defense; Disasters; Network architecture; Ontology; Risk management; Semantics; Collective intelligences; Conceptual frameworks; Distributed operations; Emergency; Emergency management; Emergency operations; Network centric operations; Organizational structures; Information systems
Abstract Emergency Management, like other fields of Operations, consists of information, communication and decision making. Thanks to the pervasiveness of real time networked infrastructures, such as the internet and the web, new models of operations are emerging, designed to leverage the aggregate the power of 'collective intelligence' and 'distributed action' facilitated by 'open world' systems environments. In order to develop effective information systems capable of supporting the distributed nature of emerging 'architectures of participation', it is necessary to devise adequate 'semantic structures', which in turn rely on sound and explicit conceptual frameworks, such as ontologies. However, there aren't enough 'ontologies' in the public domain that can be referenced to establish compatibility of architectures and serve as guidelines for the development of open, neutral and accountable information systems. In this paper we a) describe and analyse the 'distributed' and 'networked' nature of emergency operations b) put forward the notion information systems to support of emergency management today should be modeled on 'distributed' and networked organizational structures, and that ontologies in this domain should be built accordingly.
Address School of Information Technology, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM Place of Publication Washington, DC Editor F. Fiedrich, B. Van de Walle
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780615206974 Medium
Track Ontologies for Crisis Management Expedition Conference 5th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 445
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Author Kate Starbird; Jeannie Stamberger
Title Tweak the tweet: Leveraging microblogging proliferation with a prescriptive syntax to support citizen reporting Type Conference Article
Year 2010 Publication ISCRAM 2010 – 7th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management: Defining Crisis Management 3.0, Proceedings Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2010
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Disasters; Hazards; Information systems; Social networking (online); Syntactics; Collective intelligences; Crisis informatics; Emergency; Information convergence; Information diffusion; Microblogging; Technology diffusion; Electric grounding
Abstract In this paper, we propose a low-tech solution for use by microbloggers that could enhance their ability to rapidly produce parsable, crisis-relevant information in mass emergencies. We build upon existing research on the use of social media during mass emergencies and disasters. Our proposed intervention aims to leverage the affordances of mobile microblogging and the drive to support citizen reporting within current behavioral Twitter-based microblogging practice. We introduce a prescriptive, tweet-based syntax that could increase the utility of information generated during emergencies by gently reshaping current behavioral practice. This offering is grounded in an understanding of current trends in norm evolution of Twitter use, an evolution that has progressed quickly but appears to be stabilizing around specific textual conventions.
Address ConnectivIT Lab, ATLAS, University of Colorado, Boulder, United States; Disaster Management Initiative, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM Place of Publication Seattle, WA Editor S. French, B. Tomaszewski, C. Zobel
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN Medium
Track Collaboration and Social Networking Expedition Conference 7th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 971
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Author Kate Starbird; Leysia Palen
Title Pass it on?: Retweeting in mass emergency Type Conference Article
Year 2010 Publication ISCRAM 2010 – 7th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management: Defining Crisis Management 3.0, Proceedings Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2010
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Fires; Floods; Hardware; Collective intelligences; Crisis informatics; Information convergence; Microblogging; Social cognition; Information systems
Abstract We examine microblogged information generated during two different co-occurring natural hazards events in Spring 2009. Due to its rapid and widespread adoption, microblogging in emergency response is a place for serious consideration and experimentation for future application. Because microblogging is comprised of a set of practices shaped by a number of forces, it is important to measure and describe the diffuse, multiparty information exchange behaviors to anticipate how emergency governance might best play a role. Here we direct consideration toward information propagation properties in the Twitterverse, describing features of information redistribution related to the retweet (RT ) convention. Our analysis shows that during an emergency, for tweets authored by local users and tweets that contain emergency-related search terms, retweets are more likely than non-retweets to be about the event. We note that users are more likely to retweet information originally distributed through Twitter accounts run by media, especially the local media, and traditional service organizations. Comparing local users to the broader audience, we also find that tweet-based information redistribution is different for those who are local to an emergency event.
Address ConnectivIT Lab, ATLAS, University of Colorado, Boulder, United States; ConnectivIT Lab, Computer Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM Place of Publication Seattle, WA Editor S. French, B. Tomaszewski, C. Zobel
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN Medium
Track Collaboration and Social Networking Expedition Conference 7th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 970
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Author Sara Vieweg; Leysia Palen; Sophia B. Liu; Amanda L. Hughes; Jeannette N. Sutton
Title Collective intelligence in disaster: Examination of the phenomenon in the aftermath of the 2007 Virginia Tech Shooting Type Conference Article
Year 2008 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM 2008 – 5th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2008
Volume Issue Pages 44-54
Keywords Disasters; Information systems; Collective intelligences; Crisis informatics; Distributed cognition; Facebook; Virginia Tech; Social networking (online)
Abstract We report on the results of an investigation about the “informal, ” public-side communications that occurred in the aftermath of the April 16, 2007 Virginia Tech (VT) Shooting. Our on-going research reveals several examples of on-line social interaction organized around the goal of collective problem-solving. In this paper, we focus on specific instances of this distributed problem-solving activity, and explain, using an ethnomethodological lens, how a loosely connected group of people can work together on a grave topic to provide accurate results.
Address ConnectivIT, Natural Hazards Center, University of Colorado, Boulder, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM Place of Publication Washington, DC Editor F. Fiedrich, B. Van de Walle
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780615206974 Medium
Track Social Networking, Web Collaboration and e Participation in Crisis and Risk Managements Expedition Conference 5th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1051
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Author Connie White; Linda Plotnick; Jane Kushma; Starr Roxanne Hiltz; Murray Turoff
Title An online social network for emergency management Type Conference Article
Year 2009 Publication ISCRAM 2009 – 6th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management: Boundary Spanning Initiatives and New Perspectives Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2009
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Civil defense; Disasters; Information dissemination; Information systems; Online systems; Risk management; Collaboration; Collective intelligences; Emergency; Emergency management; Exploratory research; On-line communities; On-line social networks; Online social networkings; Social networking (online)
Abstract Online Social Networking Sites (SNS) are becoming extremely popular and can be employed in a variety of contexts. They permit the establishment of global relationships that are domain related or can be based on some general need shared by the participants. Emergency domain related websites, each with their own stated mission, are becoming widespread. Can a social network offer a solution to bringing emergency domain-related entities together as a 'one stop shop?' We propose to investigate whether the social network paradigm can be used to enable individuals and organizations to collaborate in mutually beneficial ways, in all stages of emergency management: mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. Emergency management students were surveyed to examine the concept of social networks and their acceptance as a potential tool. The results of this exploratory research show overwhelming agreement that SNS should be considered a viable solution to the problems plaguing information dissemination and communications in the emergency domain.
Address Institute for Emergency Preparedness, Jacksonville State University, Jacksonville, AL, United States; Information Systems Department, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM Place of Publication Gothenburg Editor J. Landgren, S. Jul
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9789163347153 Medium
Track Collaboration and Social Networking Expedition Conference 6th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1081
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