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Author (up) Ahmed Alnuhayt; Suvodeep Mazumdar; Vitaveska Lanfranchi; Frank Hopfgartner pdf  isbn
openurl 
  Title Understanding Reactions to Misinformation – A Covid-19 Perspective Type Conference Article
  Year 2022 Publication ISCRAM 2022 Conference Proceedings 19th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal Iscram 2022  
  Volume Issue Pages 687-700  
  Keywords Misinformation; social reactions; twitter; people; COVID-19  
  Abstract The increasing use of social media as an information source brings further challenges – social media platforms can be an excellent medium for disseminating public awareness and critical information, that can be shared across large populations. However, misinformation in social media can have immense implications on public health, risking the effectiveness of health interventions as well as lives. This has been particularly true in the case of COVID-19 pandemic, with a range of misinformation, conspiracy theories and propaganda being spread across social channels. In our study, through a questionnaire survey, we set out to understand how members of the public interact with different sources when looking for information on COVID-19. We explored how participants react when they encounter information they believe to be misinformation. Through a set of three behaviour tasks, synthetic misinformation posts were provided to the participants who chose how they would react to them. In this work in progress study, we present initial findings and insights into our analysis of the data collected. We highlight what are the most common reactions to misinformation and also how these reactions are different based on the type of misinformation.  
  Address Information School University of Sheffield; Information School University of Sheffield; Computer Science University of Sheffield; Information School University of Sheffield  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Tarbes, France Editor Rob Grace; Hossein Baharmand  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 978-82-8427-099-9 Medium  
  Track Social Media for Crisis Management Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number ISCRAM @ idladmin @ Serial 2448  
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Author (up) Dharma Dailey; Kate Starbird pdf  isbn
openurl 
  Title Visible skepticism: Community vetting after Hurricane Irene Type Conference Article
  Year 2014 Publication ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings – 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2014  
  Volume Issue Pages 777-781  
  Keywords Hardware; Crisis informatics; Crowdsourcing; Information diffusion; Journalism; Misinformation; Rumors; Social media; Information systems  
  Abstract Social media enable rapid, peer-to-peer information flow during crisis events, affordances that have both positive and negative consequences. The potential for spreading misinformation is a significant concern. Drawing on an empirical study of information-sharing practices in a crisis-affected community in the Catskill Mountains after Hurricane Irene, this paper describes how an ad hoc group of community members, led by a handful of journalists, employed specific work practices to mitigate misinformation. We illustrate how the group appropriated specific tools and performed visible skepticism, among other techniques, to help control the spread of false rumors. These findings suggest implications for the design of tools and the development of best practices for supporting community-led, crowd-powered response efforts during disasters.  
  Address Human Centered Design and Engineering, University of Washington, United States  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher The Pennsylvania State University Place of Publication University Park, PA Editor S.R. Hiltz, M.S. Pfaff, L. Plotnick, and P.C. Shih.  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780692211946 Medium  
  Track Social Media in Crisis Response and Management Expedition Conference 11th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 421  
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Author (up) Natalie D. Baker; Spyridon Samonas; Kristine Artello pdf  isbn
openurl 
  Title (Not) Welcome to the US: Hyper-Ebola and the Crisis of Misinformation Type Conference Article
  Year 2015 Publication ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings ? 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2015  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Culture of Fear; Ebola in the US; Mass Media; Misinformation; Nationalism; Scientific Literacy  
  Abstract A hyperbolic portrayal of Ebola in the US resulted in a crisis of misinformation, when an actual outbreak never occurred. We study how online mass media uses discourse in the constitution of a culture of fear, and how non-expert actors (e.g. media) employ a specific line of discussion to legitimize actions outside of science. Strange nationalism is afantastical construction of foreign, invasive crises. This discourse was used in online media to create an imagined Ebola outbreak, which legitimized inappropriate disease management policies, since outbreak was positioned as fact. Information featured on mass media provides input to crisis and emergency management information systems, such as the Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System (GDACS). In this respect, online media play a key role in informing the public about crisis through the construction of real or imagined emergencies. How crisis is framed affects both public understanding and response by authorities.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher University of Agder (UiA) Place of Publication Kristiansand, Norway Editor L. Palen; M. Buscher; T. Comes; A. Hughes  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9788271177881 Medium  
  Track Ethical, Legal and Social Issues Expedition Conference ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings ? 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1199  
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Author (up) Shangde Gao; Yan Wang; Lisa Platt pdf  openurl
  Title Modeling U.S. Health Agencies' Message Dissemination on Twitter and Users' Exposure to Vaccine-related Misinformation Using System Dynamics Type Conference Article
  Year 2021 Publication ISCRAM 2021 Conference Proceedings – 18th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal Iscram 2021  
  Volume Issue Pages 333-344  
  Keywords COVID-19, misinformation, social media, System Dynamics, vaccine hesitancy  
  Abstract This research intends to answer: how do (i) generation frequency and (ii) retweeting count of health agencies' messages impact the exposure of the general users to vaccine-related misinformation on Twitter? We creatively employed a Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) System Dynamics paradigm to model interactions between message dissemination of 168 U.S. health agencies and proportions of users who are at different exposure statuses to misinformation, namely “Susceptible”, “Infected”, or “Recovered” status. The SIR model was built based on the vaccine-relevant tweets posted over November and December in 2020. Our preliminary outcomes suggest that augmenting the generation frequency of agencies' messages and increasing retweeting count can effectively moderate the exposure risk to vaccine-related misinformation. This model illustrates how health agencies may combat vaccine hesitancy through credible information dissemination on social media. It offers a novel approach for crisis informatics studies to model different information categories and the impacted population in the complex digital world.  
  Address University of Florida; University of Florida; University of Florida  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Virginia Tech Place of Publication Blacksburg, VA (USA) Editor Anouck Adrot; Rob Grace; Kathleen Moore; Christopher W. Zobel  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 978-1-949373-61-5 ISBN Medium  
  Track Disaster Public Health & Healthcare Informatics in the Pandemic Expedition Conference 18th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management  
  Notes gao.shangde@ufl.edu Approved no  
  Call Number ISCRAM @ idladmin @ Serial 2337  
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