|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Cornelia Caragea; Nathan McNeese; Anuj Jaiswal; Greg Traylor; Hyun-Woo Kim; Prasenjit Mitra; Dinghao Wu; Andrea H. Tapia; Lee Giles; Bernard J. Jansen; John Yen
Title Classifying text messages for the haiti earthquake Type Conference Article
Year 2011 Publication 8th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management: From Early-Warning Systems to Preparedness and Training, ISCRAM 2011 Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2011
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Abstracting; Artificial intelligence; Disaster prevention; Information systems; Learning systems; Text processing; Disaster relief; Emergency response; Emergency situation; Haiti earthquakes; Information technology infrastructure; Nongovernmental organizations; Relief workers; Self-organizing behavior; Earthquakes
Abstract In case of emergencies (e.g., earthquakes, flooding), rapid responses are needed in order to address victims' requests for help. Social media used around crises involves self-organizing behavior that can produce accurate results, often in advance of official communications. This allows affected population to send tweets or text messages, and hence, make them heard. The ability to classify tweets and text messages automatically, together with the ability to deliver the relevant information to the appropriate personnel are essential for enabling the personnel to timely and efficiently work to address the most urgent needs, and to understand the emergency situation better. In this study, we developed a reusable information technology infrastructure, called Enhanced Messaging for the Emergency Response Sector (EMERSE), which classifies and aggregates tweets and text messages about the Haiti disaster relief so that non-governmental organizations, relief workers, people in Haiti, and their friends and families can easily access them.
Address College of Information Sciences and Technology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA-16801, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM Place of Publication Lisbon Editor M.A. Santos, L. Sousa, E. Portela
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9789724922478 Medium
Track Analytical Information Systems Expedition Conference 8th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 371
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author Erik R. Janus; Susan Manente; Sharon L. Lee
Title Best practices in chemical emergency risk communication: The Interstate Chemical Terrorism Workgroup Type Conference Article
Year 2008 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM 2008 – 5th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2008
Volume Issue Pages 774-777
Keywords Information systems; Public health; Risks; Centers for disease control and preventions; Chemical terrorism; Information overloads; Nongovernmental organizations; Public health preparedness; Public-health agencies; Risk communication; Workgroups; Terrorism
Abstract The Interstate Chemical Terrorism Workgroup (ICTW) was formed in 2002 and currently includes members from nearly all states and Washington, DC, as well as representation from a number of non-governmental organizations. In addition to offering monthly conference call/presentations, the ICTW partnered with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2003 to host a workshop to address basic elements of risk communication needs in a chemical event. The primary goal of the workshop was to develop a list of core competencies and benchmarks as well as a series of fact sheet templates destined for the general public and press, health care providers, public health department and/or officials, and first response and emergency workers (Lee et al., 2006). Key findings of the 2003 workshop, along with other work being done by CDC, academia and the states, underscore the importance of public health agencies in providing risk communication services during (and particularly after) chemical emergencies, whether intentional or not. Tools developed by the ICTW have been used and/or consulted by many groups involved in public health preparedness. This case study will examine the efforts of Michigan to implement these tools to reduce information overload in an emergency.
Address University of Maryland University College, United States; Michigan Department of Community Health, United States; California Department of Public Health, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM Place of Publication Washington, DC Editor F. Fiedrich, B. Van de Walle
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9780615206974 Medium
Track Applications for Mitigating Information Overload Expedition Conference 5th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 620
Share this record to Facebook
 

 
Author Shuming Liu; Christopher Brewster; Duncan Shaw
Title Ontologies for crisis management: A review of state of the art in ontology design and usability Type Conference Article
Year 2013 Publication ISCRAM 2013 Conference Proceedings – 10th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Abbreviated Journal ISCRAM 2013
Volume Issue Pages 349-359
Keywords Information systems; Interoperability; Ontology; Risk management; Semantic Web; Societies and institutions; Crisis management; Crisis management systems; Emergency management; Information interoperability; Information sharing; Nongovernmental organizations; Ontology design; Semantic Web technology; Management information systems
Abstract The growing use of a variety of information systems in crisis management both by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and emergency management agencies makes the challenges of information sharing and interoperability increasingly important. The use of semantic web technologies is a growing area and is a technology stack specifically suited to these challenges. This paper presents a review of ontologies, vocabularies and taxonomies that are useful in crisis management systems. We identify the different subject areas relevant to crisis management based on a review of the literature. The different ontologies and vocabularies available are analysed in terms of their coverage, design and usability. We also consider the use cases for which they were designed and the degree to which they follow a variety of standards. While providing comprehensive ontologies for the crisis domain is not feasible or desirable there is considerable scope to develop ontologies for the subject areas not currently covered and for the purposes of interoperability.
Address Aston Business School, Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom; Warwick Business School, University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Karlsruher Institut fur Technologie Place of Publication KIT; Baden-Baden Editor T. Comes, F. Fiedrich, S. Fortier, J. Geldermann and T. Müller
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2411-3387 ISBN 9783923704804 Medium
Track Emergency Management Information Systems Expedition Conference 10th International ISCRAM Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 714
Share this record to Facebook