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Author (up) Aladdin Shamoug; Stephen Cranefield; Grant Dick
Title Information Retrieval for Humanitarian Crises via a Semantically Classified Word Embedding Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 132-144
Keywords Ontologies, Word Embedding, Information Retrieval, Humanitarian Crisis, Humanitarian Response.
Abstract Decision-makers in humanitarian crisis need information to guide them in making critical decisions. Finding information in such environments is a challenging task. Therefore, decision-makers rely on domain experts who possess experience and knowledge from previous humanitarian crises to provide them with the information they need. In this paper, we explore the ability of the existing computing technologies to augment the capabilities of those experts and help decision-makers to make faster and better decisions. Among many computing technologies we have today, word embedding and the semantic web are able to support such augmentation of the domain expert. In this paper, we train a word embedding model using word2vec, transform words and terms from news archive to entities in domain ontology, annotate those entities with their equivalent concepts from upper ontologies, and reason about them using semantic similarity and semantic matching, to represent and retrieve knowledge, and answer questions of interest to decision-makers in humanitarian crises. The approach was evaluated by comparing the use of word embeddings with and without semantic classification for the retrieval of information about the current humanitarian crisis in Syria.
Address University of Otago; University of Otago; University of Otago
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-0-473-45447-0 Medium
Track Data Issues for Situation/Disaster Awareness Expedition Conference ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience - 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific
Notes aladdin.shamoug@postgrad.otago.ac.nz Approved no
Call Number Serial 1676
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Author (up) Andrew Flaws; Chris Purchas
Title A Web GIS Tool for Disaster Waste Management Planning in New Zealand Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 272-278
Keywords web GIS, waste, ESRI, disaster
Abstract To date, the management of waste-streams generated by natural and anthropogenic disasters in New Zealand has been ad hoc, with planning largely taking place post rather than pre event. A valid reason for this is that the severity and consequences of such events varies widely, dictating the type and quantity of waste produced. To help mitigate problems caused by unplanned waste, a web GIS tool is being developed for use in a pre-event planning exercise and for developing quick early estimates of waste during an event. The tool models the amount of waste generated by different types of natural disasters, quantifying the amount of waste for different waste-streams. The user can then find the nearest suitable waste disposal location, accounting for barriers. This tool could be of great value for local government. It is flexible, so that can quickly and simply be extended to other regions and the intention is for regional councils to host the tool within their own GIS environment.
Address T+T; T+T
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-0-473-45447-0 Medium
Track Geospatial and temporal information capture, management, and analytics in support of Disaster Decision Making Expedition Conference ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience - 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific
Notes aflaws@tonkintaylor.co.nz Approved no
Call Number Serial 1690
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Author (up) Andrew Sherson; S Uma; Raj Prasanna
Title The effect of localised factors on water pipe repair times post-earthquake Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 366-380
Keywords Lifelines, Earthquake, Localised factors, repair times
Abstract In the Wellington Region, many lifelines are at risk, because they are in vulnerable narrow corridors close to active faults. In an earthquake, it is expected that these lifelines will be significantly damaged and unusable for extended periods of time. Because of this risk, many studies have been conducted to investigate the resulting downtimes. These studies, despite their usefulness, do not incorporate or make significant assumptions about localised factors. This paper summarises a thesis that aimed to improve the current predictive models, by including these local, and contextual influences. Multiple stakeholders who manage and repair the lifelines were interviewed to identify these factors which were then included into one of the current predictive models, and the influence on repair times was recorded. It was discovered that localised impacts such as staff logistics, land sliding, the land gradient, interdependency, and access doubled previous predicted repair times.
Address Joint Centre for Disaster Research / Massey University; Stantec; GNS Science
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-0-473-45447-0 Medium
Track Understanding Risk, Risk Reduction, Consequences and Forecasting Expedition Conference ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience - 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific
Notes sherson.andrew@gmail.com Approved no
Call Number Serial 1685
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Author (up) Briony Gray; Mark Weal; David Martin
Title Supporting Situational Awareness during Disasters: The Case of Hurricane Irma Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 123-131
Keywords Situational Awareness, Hurricane Irma, Conceptual Framework, Disaster Management, Social Media
Abstract In a rapidly globalizing world, disasters and the way in which they are managed are changing. Social media, in conjunction with other online resources, now provide a wealth of information throughout the lifecycle of disasters and are relied upon by individuals and emergency responders alike. The study of such data as a lens for analysis has proved valuable in recent years, with many contributing to targeted emergency response protocols and improved methods for the management strategies of future crises. This study seeks to make a similar contribution by reporting on the use of such data for situational awareness during the case of hurricane Irma, which occurred between September and August 2017. Using a mixed methods approach the paper examines data from social media such as Twitter, as well as other online sources such as blogs and news media, to provide original insight into the disaster. A conceptual framework is then applied to determine the uses and users of social media, and to identify how these change throughout the course of the disaster, thus demonstrating situational awareness over time. The paper concludes with proposed improvements for disaster management and emergency response for future similar disasters, specifically in the hurricane season, in addition to more generalized hazards which are predicted to increase in their frequency and severity due to underlying issues such as climate change.
Address University of Southampton; University of Southampton; University of Southampton
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-0-473-45447-0 Medium
Track Data Issues for Situation/Disaster Awareness Expedition Conference ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience - 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific
Notes bjg1g11@soton.ac.uk Approved no
Call Number Serial 1664
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Author (up) Briony Gray; Mark Weal; David Martin
Title Building Resilience in Small Island Developing States: Social Media during the 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 469-479
Keywords Social Media, Hurricanes, Resiliency, Community Engagement, SIDS
Abstract There are growing concerns that future Atlantic hurricane seasons will be severe and unpredictable due to underlying factors such as climate change. The 2017 season may offer a range of lessons, especially to small island developing states (SIDS), who are looking to build community resilience and heighten community engagement to cope with disaster. While many SIDS utilise a range of media and technology for these purposes, there has been a recent uptake in the use of social media, which may have further potential to support their goals. This paper scopes the use and users of social media in the case of Antigua and Barbuda during the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season. Through a series of qualitative interviews it explains the role that social media currently has, and concludes with suggestions for its improvement in future seasons that are contextualized over the disaster lifecycle phases.
Address University of Southampton; University of Southampton; University of Southampton
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-0-473-45447-0 Medium
Track Social Media and Community Engagement Supporting Resilience Building Expedition Conference ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience - 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific
Notes bjg1g11@soton.ac.uk Approved no
Call Number Serial 1688
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Author (up) Cary Milkop; Najif Ismail
Title The Poor Performance of Non Structural Components in Seismic Events in Context Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 351-365
Keywords seismology earthquake retrofitting
Abstract Damage to non-structural components (NSCs) in seismic events has been identified as a recurring problem in New Zealand for decades. It is also a problem in comparable seismic risk countries. Whilst improvements have been made and lessons learned, the complexity of suspended ceilings has also grown. The purpose of this article is to review the situation for suspended NSCs and to discuss recommendations. Whilst NSCs have not received the attention that structural components have, they are a significant source of costs and consequences should they fail in seismic events. Several articles have emerged surrounding NSC failure but owing to the inherent complexity of the subject, there is no one document that covers all aspects. The poor performance of NSCs in seismic events has been known and written about for several decades. The USA is a comparable and useful source of information around what has proven to be effective and system-changing.
Address Wellington Institute of Technology; Wellington Institute of Technology
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-0-473-45447-0 Medium
Track Understanding Risk, Risk Reduction, Consequences and Forecasting Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1681
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Author (up) Cécile L'Hermitte; William Wang; Eric Deakins
Title Exploring the Physical Internet concept to improve disaster relief operations Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 12-27
Keywords Emergency Response; Disaster Relief; Physical Internet; Logistics; Supply Chain Management
Abstract Successful disaster relief operations call for responsive and flexible movements of goods in order to make the relief items available when and where they are needed by the affected communities. The objective of this explorative research is to investigate the applicability of the Physical Internet to emergency relief operations. The Physical Internet is a groundbreaking logistical system in which standardised, modular packages are automatically routed from origin to destination through a hyperconnected network of logistics providers and facilities. Although the concept is receiving growing attention from academics, practitioners and policy makers, research in the disaster management context is virtually non-existent. Based on a review of the relevant academic literature and publicly available information from emergency responding agencies and the media, we firstly use the Kaikoura earthquake that occurred in the South Island of New Zealand on 14th November 2016 to identify six key requirements that support the efficient movement of relief items in the aftermath of a disaster. We then identify six characteristics of the Physical Internet and explore how these characteristics can support the requirements of emergency response operations. We conclude that the Physical Internet principles have the potential to enhance the speed, flexibility and reliability of emergency responses. In other words, a fully integrated and collaborative logistics system in which relief items and information move seamlessly across a web of interconnected transport modes and operators can increase the efficient deployment of urgently needed relief items. This study extends the Physical Internet principles to emergency relief operations and identifies new ways of improving and optimising the logistics of emergency responses. In doing so, this research aims to stimulate debate within the disaster relief sector.
Address University of Waikato; University of Waikato; University of Waikato
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Resilience to cope with the unexpected Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1648
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Author (up) Cedric Papion
Title Water supply network resilience in the Wellington Region Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 263-271
Keywords Water supply, seismic resilience, geo-spatial optimization
Abstract Wellington sits across an active seismic fault line and depends on remote sources for its water supply. With widespread damage expected after a large earthquake, it may be months before a minimal water supply is restored to residents, and even longer before it reaches the tap. This paper presents a recent study undertaken to identify network vulnerabilities and take water supply resilience to the next level. The study presented a possible timeline for repairs to the bulk network and restoration of supply to each suburb's reservoir. This highlighted the most critical areas where an alternative supply or storage was needed. The study also considered how to get the water to the customers after the reticulation network had been damaged. The strategy considered by Wellington Water was to develop a seismically-resilient skeleton network connecting reservoirs and key distribution points. A notable innovation was the use of algorithms to determine optimal locations for public tap stands and identify the most cost-effective critical pipe network where strengthening upgrades needed to be focused. The aspects of the project concerning its significance for the region, the overall resilience strategy and the pipeline resilience engineering were presented at the Institute of Public Works Engineering Australasia (IPWEA) and Water NZ conferences in 2017. While this paper touches on these subjects, its main focus is on the use of geospatial information for earthquake preparedness and resilience planning.
Address Stantec
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Geospatial and temporal information capture, management, and analytics in support of Disaster Decision Making Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1655
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Author (up) Deborah Bunker; Anthony Sleigh
Title The Future of Spatial Systems for Disaster Management Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 279-285
Keywords Spatial information systems, disaster management, situational awareness, community resilience.
Abstract The Spatial Futures Forum, held in Sydney in September 2017, highlighted issues that governments, emergency management organisations, academics and spatial systems research and development groups should carefully consider as they work towards a future that provides 'inter-connectedness with inclusiveness' for individuals and the societies in which they live. This is especially important when we consider the implications for disaster management when situational awareness and community resilience will be reliant on the: successful connection and integration of the 'islands' of spatial information generated by and stored in current systems; development of a real-time 'data on demand' approach to spatial systems; and the development and careful curation of an individual's 'virtual identity' from an ethical, legal, property ownership and risk perspective.
Address The University of Sydney; The University of Sydney
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Geospatial and temporal information capture, management, and analytics in support of Disaster Decision Making Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1692
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Author (up) Derek Phyn
Title New Zealand GIS for Emergency Management (NZGIS4EM): Making GIS and its practitioners integral to emergency management in New Zealand Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 223-232
Keywords GIS Emergency Management New Zealand
Abstract Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have often been poorly considered, planned and implemented across New Zealand's emergency management sector. GIS practitioners involved in emergency management events are often the ones who suffer the consequences of this. Recent significant events have reinforced both the need for a nation-wide coordinated, planned and pro-active approach to implementing GIS for emergency management, and the advantages that GIS can offer to the emergency management sector if implemented properly. This paper offers insights into the “grass roots” foundation of a community called New Zealand GIS for Emergency Management (NZGIS4EM) to address these issues. In its founding year (2017/2018) the priority for an interim NZGIS4EM committee has been to establish the foundation of the community, this is primarily administrative projects. Several other subject targeted projects are also underway or planned relating to data, standards, symbology, common operating picture and interoperability. Key challenges for NZGIS4EM relate to a shortage of funding, logistics of physical meetings, current lack of governance and a lack of legal mandate in New Zealand to enforce standards for emergency management. Attention in the sector is now moving towards the implementation of a Common Operating (or Operational) Picture (COP). Key messages that the author believes are pertinent include: that it's not all about the tools; plan big, but then prioritise and implement small; ensure the COP is used BAU; minimal or no training should be required; ensure it is quicker for frontline users; ensure there is a plan B and a plan C if the internet and/or power goes out; identify and lobby agencies who should be the authoritative source of truth for essential data; implement phases of response for information requirements; consider national and/or regional hosting of platforms, and; recognize that real-time crowd sourced data may be the future of intelligence and plan for that.
Address Waikato Regional Council
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Geospatial and temporal information capture, management, and analytics in support of Disaster Decision Making Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1646
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Author (up) Diana De Alwis; Ilan Noy
Title Sri Lankan Households a Decade after the Indian Ocean Tsunami Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 339-350
Keywords Sri Lanka, tsunami, disaster, household survey, long-run impact
Abstract We estimate the causal effect of the Indian Ocean tsunami in Sri Lanka on household income and consumption eight years after the event, using a quasi-experimental method. A strong association between area-wide tsunami disaster shock and increases in household income and consumption in the long-term emerged from our empirical investigation. Deviating from the common observation on short-term impacts, these results are suggestive of an optimistic potential for some long-lasting potentially successful recovery scenarios. Still, Sri Lanka received a very large amount of external transfers post-tsunami, much larger than is typical for disaster events and one which may not be replicable in other cases. Our findings suggest a more nuanced picture with respect to household consumption impacts. We observe a reduction of food consumption and only find an increase in non-food consumption. The increase in non-food consumption is much smaller than the observed increase in income. We also find that households in high-income regions experienced much better recovery from the disaster. Keywords Sri Lanka, Tsunami, disaster, household survey, long-run impact
Address Victoria University of Wellington; Victoria University of Wellington
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Understanding Risk, Risk Reduction, Consequences and Forecasting Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1662
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Author (up) Emma Hudson-Doyle; Douglas Paton; David Johnston
Title Reflections on the communication of uncertainty: developing decision-relevant information Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 166-189
Keywords Uncertainty, Communication, Decision-making, Participatory, Advice
Abstract Successful emergency management decision-making during natural hazard events is fundamentally dependent upon individual and team situation awareness (i.e., how selection, interpretation, and understanding of available information defines the problem and identifies solutions) while operating under high time and risk pressures. The development and evolution of SA, and response effectiveness during a crisis, depends upon information and advice from external experts. This advice is characterised by stochastic (system variability) and epistemic (lack of knowledge) uncertainty, constraining decision-making and blocking or delaying action. How this uncertainty is communicated, and managed, varies throughout the phases of emergency management. Through this 'Insight' paper, we review how people cope with uncertainty, individual and team factors that affect uncertainty communication, and inter-agency methods to enhance communication. We propose communicators move from a one-way dissemination of advice, towards two-way and participatory approaches that identify decision-relevant uncertainty information needs pre-event, for communication efforts to focus on in-event.
Address Joint Centre for Disaster Research / Massey University; Joint Centre for Disaster Research / Massey University; College of Health and Human Sciences, Charles Darwin University; GNS Science
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Data Issues for Situation/Disaster Awareness Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1650
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Author (up) Gavin Treadgold; James Gunn; Paul Morton; Simon Chambers
Title Developing a regional approach and strategy for geographical information systems for emergency management Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 190-199
Keywords Emergency management, geospatial information, information management, common operating picture, interoperability
Abstract This paper outlines practitioner work-in-progress in Canterbury, New Zealand, to develop a regional approach for geographical information systems (GIS) for emergency management. This is based upon recent events in Canterbury including earthquakes, floods, and fire; as well as New Zealand-wide work that is being done under the NZ GIS4EM banner. It introduces our approach, discusses a mind map that is being used to track desired data sets, plans to develop applications to support response functions in emergency operations centres, and the goal of using the common data sets as the basis of a common operating picture for Canterbury. Risks and issues associated with this work are highlighted, and then the draft strategy is introduced with desired outcomes and principles to achieve this goal. While initial work is primarily focused on GIS, the expectation is that the approach will be expanded to take a broader information management perspective in future.
Address Christchurch City Council; Environment Canterbury; Canterbury Civil Defence Emergency Management Group; Ministry of Civil Defence Emergency Management
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Data Issues for Situation/Disaster Awareness Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1678
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Author (up) Hans J Scholl; Karyn Hubbell; Jeff Leonard
Title Communications and Technology Challenges to Situational Awareness: Insights from the CR16 Exercise Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 28-43
Keywords
Abstract Saving and sustaining lives, stabilizing the incident, and protecting both environment and property from further damage are professional responders' first and foremost objectives when responding to any incident including a catastrophic one. For so doing, responders need to gain situational awareness (SA) so to effectively direct the response. Yet, in a catastrophic incident, critical infrastructures including response assets are damaged and disrupted, which leaves responders without the badly needed complete and verified information for days and even weeks. Critical communication and technology infrastructures used by responders are among those damaged and disrupted critical assets leading to both incomplete SA and a distorted common operating picture (COP). The lack of clear and comprehensive SA/COP and the disruption of communications and technology infrastructures seriously impedes incident commanders from efficiently directing the response effort. This study reports on communication and technology-relatedchallenges that emergency responders faced with regard to situational awareness in a recent large-scale exercise under the name of Cascadia Rising 2016 (CR16). The exercise involved a total of 23,000 active participants. Over four days in June of 2016, CR16 simulated the coordinated response to a rupture of the 800-mile Cascadia Subduction Zone resulting in a magnitude-9 earthquake and tsunami similar to the catastrophic incident in Eastern Japan in 2011. Responders at all levels were severely challenged, and the exercise revealed major vulnerabilities in critical communication and technology infrastructures. Situational awareness was very difficult to establish.
Address University of Washington; University of Washington; University of Washington
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Resilience to cope with the unexpected Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1651
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Author (up) Hongmin Li; Xukun Li; Doina Caragea; Cornelia Caragea
Title Comparison of Word Embeddings and Sentence Encodings for Generalized Representations in Crisis Tweet Classifications Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 480-493
Keywords Word Embeddings, Sentence Encodings, Reduced Tweet Representation, Crisis Tweet Classification
Abstract Many machine learning and natural language processing techniques, including supervised and domain adaptation algorithms, have been proposed and studied in the context of filtering crisis tweets. However, applying these approaches in real-time is still challenging because of time-critical requirements of emergency response operations and also diversities and unique characteristics of emergency events. In this paper, we explore the idea of building “generalized” classifiers for filtering crisis tweets that can be pre-trained, and are thus ready to use in real-time, while generalizing well on future disasters/crises data. We propose to achieve this using simple feature based adaptation with tweet representations based on word embeddings and also sentence-level embeddings, representations which do not rely on unlabeled data to achieve domain adaptations and can be easily implemented. Given that there are different types of word/sentence embeddings that are widely used, we propose to compare them to get a general idea about which type works better with crisis tweets classification tasks. Our experimental results show that GloVe embeddings in general work better with the datasets used in our evaluation, and that the supervised algorithms used in our experiments benefit from GloVe embeddings trained specifically on crisis data. Furthermore, our experimental results show that following GloVe, the sentence embeddings have great potential in crisis tweet tasks.
Address Kansas State University; Kansas State University; Kansas State University; Kansas State University
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Social Media and Community Engagement Supporting Resilience Building Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1689
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Author (up) Ilan Noy; Jacob Pastor Paz; Olga Filippova; Ken Elwood
Title A Building Inventory for Seismic Policy in an Earthquake-Prone City Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 145-152
Keywords Earthquake-prone, building inventory, retrofit, building occupancy, building standards
Abstract We describe the creation of a building inventory database that is created for Wellington, New Zealand's earthquake-prone capital city. This database aims to assist the generation of research on the risks, impacts, and viable solutions for reducing the seismic risk of existing multi-story concrete buildings in Wellington's Central Business District. The database includes structural, economic and market information on every building in the CDB. Its primary purpose is to inform a multi-disciplinary project whose aims are: (1) to provide best scientific knowledge about the expected seismic performance of concrete buildings; (2) to assess the impact of multiple building failures including the downstream consequences of associated cordoning; (3) to provide a path for seismic retrofitting that includes prioritization of retrofits; and (4) to inform the design of a regulatory structure that can facilitate the reduction of risk associated with earthquake vulnerable concrete buildings as described in aims (1)-(3).
Address Victoria University of Wellington; Victoria University of Wellington; University of Auckland; University of Auckland
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Data Issues for Situation/Disaster Awareness Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1684
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Author (up) Irmana Sampedro; Matthew Hughes
Title Underground Infrastructure and EQ events: how an advanced condition assessment and data collection process will assist in the planning for and recovery from an EQ event Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 254-262
Keywords Condition Assessment, Emergency Management, Data Collection, GIS, Earthquake
Abstract Is your organisation ready to cope with underground infrastructure condition assessment data collected after an earthquake? Drawing on lessons from the 2010-2011 Canterbury and 2016 Kaikoura earthquakes, we provide guidance on how to make small differences in how your organisation currently collects and stores the necessary condition data to prepare for emergencies, especially for small- and medium-size councils without sophisticated asset management systems. Key questions to address include: Are you receiving condition assessment data in electronic format? Are your contractors providing XY coordinates when repairs are undertaken, or when providing photographs as part of visual assessment? Do you have an asset management system able to prioritise critically damaged underground infrastructure? Do you have easy access to your current network condition for insurance purposes? Simple business-as-usual improvements will provide enhanced preparedness and resilience capability in the event of an earthquake. In addition, we provide a framework for future data collection processes.
Address Christchurch City Council; University of Canterbury
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Geospatial and temporal information capture, management, and analytics in support of Disaster Decision Making Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1667
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Author (up) Iva Seto; David Johnstone; Jennifer Campbell-Meier
Title Experts' sensemaking during the 2003 SARS crisis Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 44-55
Keywords crisis informatics; public health crisis; SARS; social sensemaking; organisational learning
Abstract This paper depicts the real-time sensemaking of experts as they worked to combat the first emerging disease of the 21st century: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). Newspaper data was analysed from the 2003 SARS crisis, with a Canadian perspective, to follow the process of solving the puzzle of this emerging disease. Retrospective sensemaking is a process that is triggered by the unexpected, which leads to actors gathering information (taking action) in order to consider possible interpretations for the unexpected event. Disease outbreaks serve as sensemaking triggers, and actors engage in retrospective sensemaking to find out the factors involved in how the outbreak happened. Prospective sensemaking (future-oriented) is employed when actors work together to plan how to combat the disease. The newspaper data demonstrate that retrospective and prospective sensemaking are tethered: to make plans to combat a disease, actors first require a collectively agreed upon understanding from which they can generate possibilities for a crisis response. This paper contributes to the field by providing concepts for long-duration crisis sensemaking, as the bulk of organisational research focuses on acute crises such as wildfires, or earthquakes.
Address Victoria University of Wellington; Victoria University of Wellington; Victoria University of Wellington
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Resilience to cope with the unexpected Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1649
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Author (up) Jacob Pastor; Ilan Noy; Isabelle Sin
Title Flood risk and flood insurance in New Zealand Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 381-399
Keywords Flood risk, insurance, liabilities
Abstract The standard framework for undertaking a risk assessment of a natural hazard involves analyzing the interaction of three components: Hazard data (in the form of maps), the elements exposed to the hazard (exposure), and measures of these elements' vulnerability (understood as the susceptibility to harm or damage). In New Zealand, national flood risk remains unquantified due to the absence of national flood inundation hazard map coverage. In this paper, we develop a methodology that aims to fill this gap by estimating instead the likelihood of a flood insurance claim for a stock of residential buildings. We estimate a non-linear limited-dependent variable model and using a set of fragility functions (also known as damage curves), we calculate the expected monetary losses under plausible flood depth scenarios. The outcome of this research could inform insurers of their potential liabilities and threats to their financial sustainability in the face of flood and storms.
Address Victoria University of Wellington; Victoria University of Wellington; MOTU
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Understanding Risk, Risk Reduction, Consequences and Forecasting Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1669
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Author (up) Jamie Shackleton
Title Citizen Translation and a Community Engagement Approach to Promoting Preparedness in CALD Communities Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 400-407
Keywords Translation, CALD, Preparedness, Community Engagement
Abstract Emergency preparedness for CALD (culturally and linguistically diverse) communities has been identified as a significant gap in DRM (disaster risk management) research and practice. Using a community engagement approach, a practitioner in Wellington, New Zealand implemented a Citizen Translation project to have volunteers from 15 communities facilitate translations for a new local Earthquake Preparedness Guide, in partnership with local Civil Defense and an international crisis translation team, INTERACT. Initial findings have shown that consultation with community members over the translation of their language has been a powerful way to establish initial links into the community and instigate discussion and feedback about emergency preparedness; it has led to further projects including emergency messaging translations. This work in progress raises an important and often overlooked discourse on inclusiveness in DRM activities and the potential for community engagement to play a role with CALD community preparedness.
Address New Zealand Red Cross
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Understanding Risk, Risk Reduction, Consequences and Forecasting Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1652
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Author (up) Jana Kaeppler
Title GIS4EM Multi-Tenanted Approach toAGOL Applications for EmergencyManagement (Mackenzie, Hurunui andKaikoura District Councils, NewZealand) Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018
Volume Issue Pages 233-245
Keywords GIS, AGOL Solutions, Emergency Management, Mackenzie, New Zealand
Abstract With the Hurunui (HDC), Mackenzie (MDC) and Kaikoura (KDC) District Councils sharing their Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Information Technology (IT) resources since 2017 it was decided to work on a GIS strategy for Emergency Management (EM) that would be applicable for all three councils as in the past geospatial skills and tools did not get equally utilised at all three councils during emergency and training events. ArcGIS Online (AGOL) was chosen as a common platform for a fully cloud based approach to the new Emergency Management Applications. The core modules of these applications are Story maps, WebApp Builder, Survey123, Operations Dashboard, Workforce and AppStudio. The development of these applications is a work-in-progress situation which is driven by the constant conversation and testing between the GIS person and the Emergency Management (EM) officers and a work flow is being developed to integrate these applications into the existing Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) picture. We believe once finalised this set of applications will add great functionality to New Zealand's Coordinated Incident Management System (CIMS) by providing interactive and cloud based visual geospatial information, situational awareness, forecasting, task management and task tracking.
Address Hurunui District Council
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Massey Univeristy Place of Publication Albany, Auckland, New Zealand Editor Kristin Stock; Deborah Bunker
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Track Geospatial and temporal information capture, management, and analytics in support of Disaster Decision Making Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1675
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Author (up) Jeff Maunder
Title The Geospatial Intelligence Continuum during Sudden Onset Disaster Response Type Conference Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of ISCRAM Asia Pacific 2018: Innovating for Resilience – 1st International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management Asia Pacific. Abbreviated Journal Iscram Ap 2018